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ODU/Jlab REU Program

List of Research Projects

Some of the available research projects are listed here. Go to the previous REU research abstracts link to see
the types of available projects.

PROJECT TITLE:
New Approaches in Tomography: Applications to Accelerator Physics and Beyond

PROJECT MENTORS:
Prof. Balsa Terzic (bterzic@odu.edu) Prof. Alex Godunov (agoduno@odu.edu) and Prof.Todd Satogata (satogata@jlab.org)

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
Tomography refers to the reconstruction of an object in n-dimensional space from a sufficient number of its projections in (n−1)-dimensional space. Tomography is widely used as a diagnostic tool in medical imaging (Compute Assisted Tomography or CAT scan). Since the 1960's there has been activity in the area of plasma physics to use tomography plasma diagnostics and since the 1980's tomography has became a valuable diagnostic tool for accelerator beams.

Tomographic reconstruction of objects is sensitively dependent on the level of noise in measurement of projections. Even modest levels ofexperimental uncertainties can lead to a complete breakdown inaccuracy of a tomographically reconstructed image. It is a goal of this study to systematically study the role of experimentalnoise on robustness of tomographic reconstruction methods, and devise a scheme which minimizes their adverse effects. The main approach studied during the course of this project will relyon a relatively novel mathematical concept called wavelet transforms. The underlying fundamental concept is that when a noisy signal is transformed to wavelet space, the signal and noise naturally separate. Our novel wavelet-based algorithm will seek to exploit this feature to remove noise from the experimental data, and thereby lead to more robust tomographic reconstuction.

REU STUDENT PARTICIPATION:
Students involved in this project will learn about importance and application of tomography, computer programming and simulation and wavelets, among other things.


PROJECT TITLE:
Application of Model Independent Analysis (MIA) to BPM Data Analysis for 12 GeV Commissioning

PROJECT MENTOR:
Dr. Rui Li (lir@jlab.org)

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
Large amount of data on machine and beam performance are collected during the recent 12 GeV commissioning, including data from the beam position monitors (BPM) along the machine. Model Independent Analysis (MIA) is a powerful algorithm that uses statistical correlation method, which can sort out dominant beam orbit information from noise background, and reveal valuable information such as BPM resolutions, residual dispersion, etc. This REU project is the first attempt to apply MIA to the Jefferson Lab BPM measurements. The outcome of this study will help to assess the feasibility of applying MIA to 12 GeV accelerator, including improvement needed in BPM data acquisition for MIA application, and to compare the machine performance with the design model


PROJECT TITLE:
Study of the effect of cavity gradient distribution on the focusing and skew focusing properties in the CEBAF linacs.

PROJECT MENTOR:
Dr. Yves Roblin (roblin@jlab.org)

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is a superconducting facility located at Jefferson Lab. It provides a continuous electron beam of up to 12 GeV for use for nuclear physics experiments in up to three experimental halls simultaneously.

The beam is generated at the electron gun equipped with a GaAs photocathode. A circularly polarized laser beam impinges on this cathode and allows for polarized electrons to be produced with a longitudinal polarization in excess of 85% and currents as high as 200 µA. The electrons have an initial kinetic energy of 130 keV, and are then accelerated, bunched, and compressed in the injector to an energy of a few tens of MeV depending on the linacs energy gains and the desired energies in the experimental halls. After the injector, acceleration to the experiment energies is achieved in two superconducting linacs, set in an anti-parallel configuration and connected by recirculation arcs. CEBAF can thus deliver beams between 0.6 and 12 GeV. The linac cavities have focusing and skew focusing terms which depends on the accelerating gradient distribution and have to be taken into account in the Optics model in order to keep the machine transport as close as possible to the design intent. The scope of this work will be to calculate the magnitude of such effects on the machine optics by utilizing ELEGANT, an optics modeling software that is currently used at CEBAF for the operational machine description.

alculate the magnitude of such effects on the machine optics by utilizing ELEGANT, an optics modeling software that is currently used at CEBAF for the operational machine description.


PROJECT TITLE:
Development and characterization of Detector Systems for Hall C

PROJECT MENTOR:
Dr. B. Sawatzky (brads@jlab.org)

PROJECT DESCRIPTION
The student will assist in the setup and testing of one or more  detector packages to be used in the 12 GeV experimental program inHall C.  The student(s) will learn how to operate an oscilloscope, setup a data acquisition system, develop a trigger, and analyze  cosmics data.

PREREQUISITES: 
Familiarity with programming (C++) is strongly encouraged.


PROJECT TITLE:
Magnetron (RF source from a kitchen microwave oven) to drive a superconducting RF cavity

PROJECT MENTOR:
Dr. Haipeng Wang (haipeng@jlab.org)

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
A proof of principle experiment is planned to demonstrate the field amplitude control of radio frequency at 2.45GHz in a superconducting niobium cavity at 2K temperature. The ultimate goal of
this project is to reduce electricity consumption of currently used klystron RF system by using a relative low cost, high efficiency magnetron driven system. The student is expected to learn the RF control circuit design, simulation and participate the magnetron control experiments both on the bench and the cavity in the Dewar. Safety training for the electrical and radiation worker, recording, documentation and analysis of experimental data and writing a research report at the end of intern are required. Advanced physics majored student can also have the chance to learn how to design a new magnetron
using Microwave Studio Suite software.


PROJECT TITLE:
Fast quarks in the neutron

PROJECT MENTOR:
Dr. Wally Melnitchouk (wmelnitc@jlab.org)

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
While much is known about how quarks and gluons make up a proton, the analogous structure of the neutron is not as well understood. This is especially true for quarks that carry a large fraction "x" of the neutron's momentum.  A global analysis of quark momentum distributions is being carried out at Jefferson Lab, in collaboration with theorists and experimentalists nationwide, aimed at accurately describing the structure of the neutron and proton in the large-x region.  This project will involve computation of several new physical effects, which have not been included in previous analyses that are important for reliably extracting quark structure information from electron scattering and other reactions at large x.

REU STUDENT PATICIPATION:
Assist with the derivation of theoretical formulas for observables in electron-nucleon scattering and related experiments. Run computer programs to calculate scattering amplitudes and cross sections numerically. It is expected that this project will result in a publication in a refereed journal. Some knowledge of quantum mechanics and/or nuclear and particle physics is advantageous. Enthusiasm for theoretical physics is essential. Familiarity with programming languages (e.g. FORTRAN, Mathematica) is desirable but not essential.


PROJECT TITLE:
Measurement of 16O(γ,α)12C with Bubble Chamber and Bremsstrahlung Beam at Jefferson Lab Injector

PROJECT MENTOR:
Dr. Riad Suleiman (suleiman@jlab.org)

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
 We plan to measure the rate of the photo-disintegration of oxygen into helium and carbon. This measurement would be based on a novel bubble-chamber technique, which makes use of the fact that a super-heated liquid (Nitrous Oxide) is sensitive to recoiling helium and carbon nuclei produced by photo-disintegration of the oxygen nuclei in the liquid.  The experiment will be carried out at Jefferson Lab Injector using a Bremsstrahlung beam.


PROJECT TITLE:
Study of the effects of surface treatments on Nb3Sn coatings.

PROJECT MENTOR:
Dr. Grigory Eremeev (grigory@jlab.org)

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
Many accelerators around the world use superconducting accelerating structures to accelerate particle beams. These accelerating structures are typically made of niobium metal, which becomes superconducting at low temperatures. Nb3Sn is an alternative superconductor that theoretically can sustain higher fields and be more efficient that niobium. Various chemical treatment can be applied to Nb3Sn surface to alter its properties and composition. We will look into application of some surface treatments and their effects on the surface