JLab Newsletter: e-OnTarget, May 16, 2006

Jefferson Lab contract awarded to Jefferson Science Associates, LLC for management and operation of world-class research facility
The Department of Energy selected Jefferson Science Associates, LLC, as the contractor for management and operation of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The new contract, which has a potential value of $2 billion, becomes effective June 1, 2006. JLab is currently in a contract transition period.

 

HAPPEx results generate interest at American Physical Society meeting
The Hall A Proton Parity Experiment collaboration announced its most recent result at a JLab seminar on April 21 and twice at the American Physical Society April meeting in Dallas, Texas, on April 23. The first APS announcement whet the appetite of a packed room of physicists and dignitaries, and the second was made to an enthusiastic crowd of science reporters at an APS-sponsored news conference.

 

First neutrons produced by DOE's Spallation Neutron Source
One of the largest and most anticipated U.S. science construction projects of the past several decades has passed its most significant performance test. The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source, located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has generated its first neutrons.

 

Researcher uses JLab's Free-Electron Laser to seek a better treatment for severe acne
Fat may have finally met its match: laser light. Researchers at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School and Jefferson Lab have shown, for the first time, that a laser can preferentially heat lipid-rich tissues, or fat, in the body without harming the overlying skin.

 

Leadership changes announced for JLab's SRF Institute
Earlier this year, Accelerator Division Associate Director Swapan Chattopadhyay announced leadership changes at the top of JLab's Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Institute.

 

Information Resources staff moves the library into the 21st century
Jefferson Lab's Information Resources staff is actively involved with its clientele and the growth and evolution of its customer services. Successful implementation of web-based desktop services has left little reason for most of JLab's staff and user community to physically come to the library these days.

 

Check out FreeStock before you order JLab job supplies
Before you order supplies for a JLab job, or you've run short of supplies midway through a project, visit the JLab Stockroom's FreeStock area. FreeStock carries wiring, cabling, switches (resistors, connectors and other electronic items), fasteners (nuts, bolts and washers), and some general office supplies.

 

Register, volunteer now for JLab's 21st annual Run-A-Round
Employees, users, subcontractors and immediate family members: Mark your calendar for JLab's Annual Run-A-Round set for Wednesday, May 17. The event will feature a 1.5 mile fun run/walk followed by a picnic.

 

Science Education seeks JLab staff, users to talk with summer program teachers
This summer JLab will be hosting middle school teachers participating in the Science Education group's Teacher Academy in Physical Science (TAPS) program.

 

Department of Energy Gas Price Watch website and hotline available to consumers
Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman recently reminded consumers about the Department of Energy's (DOE) gasoline price reporting system. Consumers can report activity at local gasoline filling stations that they believe may constitute "gouging" or "price fixing" by visiting http://gaswatch.energy.gov/.

 

State College Area High School from Pennsylvania wins DOE's National Science Bowl; Virginia's TJHSST finishes in top 16
State College Area High School from State College, Pennsylvania, on May 1, 2006, won the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Science Bowl. Teams representing 65 schools from across the United States competed in this "Science Jeopardy" competition, which concluded this afternoon.

 

Samuel Aronson named interim Brookhaven National Lab director
The Board of Directors of Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA), which manages Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Department of Energy, announced on April 18 that Samuel Aronson, the Lab's Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for High Energy and Nuclear Physics, would become the Laboratory's Interim Director when Director Praveen Chaudhari stepped down on April 30, 2006.

 

Jefferson Lab contract awarded to Jefferson Science Associates, LLC for management and operation of world-class research facility (top ^)

The Department of Energy selected Jefferson Science Associates, LLC, as the contractor for management and operation of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.  The new contract, which has a potential value of $2 billion, becomes effective June 1, 2006. JLab is currently in a contract transition period.

"We have selected the team that we believe is best equipped to lead this important Office of Science laboratory for the department, and we look forward to working with them as they manage Jefferson Lab in support of the scientific community," said Raymond Orbach, Director of the Office of Science. 

The contract consists of a five-year base period with a value of $500 million. The contractor may earn up to an additional 15 years based on performance, bringing the total contract value to $2 billion over 20 years.

Jefferson Science Associates, LLC is a joint venture between Southeastern Universities Research Association, Inc., and CSC Applied Technologies, LLC, and brings the expertise of both companies to the management and operation of Jefferson Lab.  SURA, with headquarters in Washington, D.C., brings a wealth of scientific expertise in the areas of nuclear physics and accelerator technology. CSC Applied Technologies LLC, with an office in Fort Worth, Texas, brings a strong background in operations and business management systems. Christoph Leemann will continue serving as the Jefferson Lab Director in addition to now being President of JSA, LLC.

On April 12, the Department of Energy announced that it had selected Jefferson Science Associates, LLC, for the new M&O contract for Jefferson Lab. On April 14, Christoph Leemann, Jefferson Lab Director and President of JSA, LLC, signed the new contract. Director Leemann and JLab’s DOE Site Officer Manager Jim Turi posed for a photo after the contract was signed. JLab is now transitioning to the new contract.

"Both companies bring skills that will allow us to continue to raise the prominence of this laboratory, and we welcome Jefferson Science Associates, LLC, to the Office of Science team," Orbach said. Jefferson Lab is an Office of Science laboratory devoted to the study of nuclear physics. Its main focus is to understand how quarks - the basic building blocks of the nucleus of every atom - build up the matter around us. Jefferson Lab investigates the fundamental structure of matter and is also home to United States' expertise in superconducting accelerator technologies. User facilities include the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility and the Free-Electron Laser. More than 2,000 researchers from around the world are users of these facilities.

Jefferson Lab was established in 1984 and is located on a 206 acre site in Newport News, Virginia. Approximately 700 people are employed at the facility, which has an annual budget of about $100 million.

The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of national importance. It oversees and is the principal federal funding agency of the nation's research programs in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences.

The DOE announced in January 2004 that it would compete the JLab M&O contract, published a draft RFP (request for proposal) in September 2005, and a final RFP on December 13, 2005, with a submission deadline of January 25, 2006. The team under the leadership of Mike Dallas, formerly CSC Applied Technologies and now JLab's Chief Operating Officer, completed its contract proposal. In early February, the team traveled to Oak Ridge, Tenn., to deliver an oral presentation on the proposal. The contract and JLab's operations and management are now under transition to JSA. The transition will be complete before the end of May.

 

What's happening with the transition?

A small JSA/JLab management team started the process of transitioning the M&O contract to JSA immediately after the DOE contract announcement was made. For many people, working from day-to-day, the transition to the new contract will be fairly transparent. Employees are getting new JLab badges and are attending JSA orientation sessions and completing JSA employment packages. Facilities Management is tackling a 100 percent Property inventory; and the Environmental, Health and Safety Division is carrying out a Lab-wide risk analysis. By May 11, the contract-required transition activities were over 50 percent complete. Lab Director Leemann and senior management stress working safely throughout this process and have provided brief Toolbox Safety topics posted in the Key Documents section of the JSA web page, and a Work Safely During Change-Related Stress briefing given by EH&S Deputy, Bob May, at the transition kick off meeting.

 

HAPPEx results generate interest at American Physical Society meeting (top ^)

happex

A Simple View of the Experiment
The experiment measures electrons from CEBAF that have interacted with the proton in the hydrogen nucleus through either the electromagnetic force or the weak force. These electrons are captured in Hall A's High Resolution Spectrometers.

The Hall A Proton Parity Experiment collaboration announced its most recent result at a JLab seminar on April 21 and twice at the American Physical Society April meeting in Dallas, Texas, on April 23. The first APS announcement whet the appetite of a packed room of physicists and dignitaries, and the second was made to an enthusiastic crowd of science reporters at an APS-sponsored news conference. So what did HAPPEx find? 

JLab user Paul Souder of Syracuse University and Krishna Kumar, (Theory Group) University of Massachusetts, Amherst, presented the results and spoke at length with science journalists. Jefferson Lab's Physics Division Associate Director Larry Cardman and Chief Scientist Anthony W. "Tony" Thomas also helped field questions. Afterward, the result was eloquently reported by Phil Schewe, a press officer of the American Institute of Physics and lead questioner of the JLab users at the news conference. See Schewe's news story about the HAPPEx result in Physics News Update #776.

 

In addition, JLab's news release describing the HAPPEx results is available, and the main web page story also features HAPPEx results.

 

First neutrons produced by DOE's Spallation Neutron Source (top ^)

OAK RIDGE, Tenn. -- One of the largest and most anticipated U.S. science construction projects of the past several decades has passed its most significant performance test. The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source, located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has generated its first neutrons.

Research conducted at the SNS will lay the groundwork for the next generation of materials research. Scientists believe that the greatly improved ability to understand the structure of materials could lead to a virtually limitless number of innovations, including stronger and lighter airplanes, a new generation of batteries and fuel cells, and time-released drugs that target a specific body organ.

sns graphic

"The Spallation Neutron Source commissioning team achieved a major milestone at DOE's newest research facility on April 28, when a pulse of protons from the SNS accelerator struck its mercury target. I congratulate the SNS team in Oak Ridge and all the other national lab members of the SNS team and the many people across Jefferson Lab who worked diligently to accomplish Jefferson Lab's part in this project. We should be proud of our contributions to this significant event. Construction of the SNS superconducting cryomodules and its supporting refrigeration system were a major challenge, and we met that challenge with the on-time, on-budget delivery of technical systems that met or exceeded their performance specifications. The SNS team has made a great rate of progress on this project and a significant portion of that success has been made possible by JLab's core (SRF & Cryo) capabilities."

Claus Rode
Project Management and Integration Manager

Just after 2 p.m. April 28, 2006, a pulse of protons from the SNS's accelerator complex, traveling at nearly the speed of light, struck its mercury target. The protons "spalled" neutrons from the nuclei of mercury circulating inside the target. These first neutrons were recorded on equipment specially installed for the commissioning.

"To have observed 'first neutrons' on the initial SNS run is a tribute to the men and women who have worked so hard to design, construct, and now operate this magnificent facility," said Dr. Raymond L. Orbach, Director of the DOE Office of Science. "To bring a project of this scale and cost to completion on budget and ahead of schedule represents a model for all future large scale scientific projects to emulate. All of us owe all who have contributed to this achievement sincere thanks and appreciation for the opportunities you have now created for our world. It is a great moment for science."

With the linac operating initially at a much lower power than its eventual 1.4 megawatts, the target nevertheless was struck by trillions of protons, generating the first of what will become the world's most intense beams of neutrons for materials research.

 

"These first neutrons are representative of the technological breakthroughs required to establish the SNS as the world's leading facility for neutron research," said SNS Director Thom Mason. "We took on the challenges and technical risks involved in designing and delivering the linac, ring and target because we knew how much the scientific user community would benefit from the results."

The SNS's mercury target is the first of its kind. Researchers chose mercury for the target medium because, as a relatively heavy element, it is rich in neutrons. Mercury also has the capacity to absorb the powerful pulses from the linear accelerator (linac) and accumulator ring. Conventional target materials such as tungsten require cooling with water, which limits power and intensity.

The $1.4 billion SNS will have about eight times the beam power of the world's currently leading pulsed spallation source. This increase in power, when combined with the advanced instrument technology developed at SNS, will give researchers a net improvement in measured neutron beam intensity of factors of 50 to 100.

 

Researcher uses JLab's Free-Electron Laser to seek a better treatment for severe acne (top ^)

Fat may have finally met its match: laser light. Researchers at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School and Jefferson Lab have shown, for the first time, that a laser can preferentially heat lipid-rich tissues, or fat, in the body without harming the overlying skin. Laser therapies based on the new research could treat a variety of health conditions, including severe acne and atherosclerotic plaque, and possibly even cellulite. The result was presented recently at the 26th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery (ASLMS) in Boston, Mass.

In the first part of the study, researchers used human fat obtained from surgically discarded normal tissue. Based on a fat absorption spectrum, tissue was exposed to a range of wavelengths of infrared laser light (800-2600 nanometers) using the Free-Electron Laser facility at Jefferson Lab. The researchers measured how selected wavelengths heated the fat and compared the result to a similar experiment conducted with pure water. At most infrared wavelengths, water is more efficiently heated by infrared light; however, the researchers found three wavelengths - 915, 1210 and 1720 nm - where fat was more efficiently heated than water.

The researchers then exposed fresh, intact pig skin-and-fat tissue samples, about two inches thick, to free-electron laser infrared light centered around the two most promising wavelengths, 1210 and 1720 nm. To imitate potential surgical conditions, the pig skin was placed next to a cold window, which mimicked the application of a cold compress to the skin prior to laser exposure. The researchers zapped samples with beams of infrared laser light ranging from eight to 17 mm wide for about 16 seconds. They found that the 1210 nm wavelength preferentially heated pig fat up to 1 cm deep, without damaging the overlying skin. At 1210 nm, laser-induced heating of fat was more than twice that of the overlying skin; at 1720 nm, it was about 1.7 times that of skin.

Researching a better way to fight acne

acne

Rox Anderson, right, and Free-Electron Laser Scientist Steve Benson, left, discuss laser beam parameters while conducting the experiment on pig fat.

Rox Anderson, lead author on the study and a practicing dermatologist at Harvard, says the results provide a proof of principle for the use of selective photothermolysis, selectively heating tissues with light, for several potential medical applications. Dr. Anderson is most excited about the potential for using lasers to target sebaceous glands. "The root cause of acne is a lipid-rich gland, the sebaceous gland, which sits a few millimeters below the surface of the skin," Anderson says, "We want to be able to selectively target the sebaceous gland, and this research shows that if we can build lasers at this region of the spectrum, we may be able to do that."

He says a selective laser treatment for acne could potentially replace the best acne drug, which is isotretinoin (commonly known as Accutane®). The drug has major side effects and has been linked to severe birth defects in children whose mothers have used it while pregnant. Just last month, the FDA initiated the iPledge program in an attempt to reduce the number of pregnancies in female patients on the drug. These patients cannot obtain or fill their prescription unless they pass an initial screening and two negative pregnancy tests. The program also requires patients to promise to use two forms of contraception and submit a negative pregnancy test result each month while on the drug.

Dr. Anderson also envisions that laser treatments could emerge for other medical conditions involving lipid-rich tissues, such as atherosclerosis, which causes heart disease and stroke. Fatty plaques form in arteries, rupture, and kill millions of people each year. A selective treatment that stabilizes lipid plaques could be much better than previous attempts at laser treatment for heart disease.

"We can envision a fat-seeking laser, and we're heading down that path now," Anderson says. The next step is to specifically develop these potential applications. If successful, new lasers capable of producing the appropriate wavelengths can be commissioned to target fat, sebaceous glands or plaques in patients. Dr. Anderson and the Wellman Center in Boston have already contributed many laser therapies, including non-scarring skin treatments for birthmarks.

FEL becomes tool of choice for Anderson
Anderson says this study was made possible by the physics knowledge that built the JLab Free-Electron Laser (FEL) and a grant from the Department of Defense for the exploration of medical uses for FELs. "The Jefferson Lab FEL is an energy-recovering machine that produces laser light at the right wavelengths and right power that we need to do this research. This is a bit of a plug for the value of these very high-energy, accelerator-based lasers for physics. Because, in fact, they allow us to do experiments we couldn't do otherwise," he explains.

Free-Electron Laser provides unique capabilities

The FEL provides intense beams of laser light that can be tuned to a precise wavelength, and which are more powerful than beams from a conventional laser. Conventional lasers are limited in the wavelength of light they emit by the source of the electrons (such as a gas or crystal) used within the laser. In the FEL, electrons are stripped from their atoms, then whipped up to high energies by a linear accelerator. From there, they are steered into a wiggler, a device that uses an electromagnetic field to shake the electrons, forcing them to release some of their energy in the form of photons. As in a conventional laser, the photons are bounced between two mirrors and then emitted as a coherent beam of light. However, FEL operators can adjust the wavelength of the laser's emitted light by increasing or decreasing the energies of the electrons in the accelerator or the amount of shaking in the wiggler.

Fred Dylla, FEL project manager, agrees. "The FEL has opened up a wide variety of research opportunities in all the sciences and is leading to great strides in applied research, such as defense technologies, medicine, and nanomaterials," Dylla says, "Every day, we're discovering new applications for the FEL."

The Jefferson Lab FEL is built on the same technology - superconducting radiofrequency accelerator technology - that drives the Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). CEBAF provides a nearly continuous beam of electrons for nuclear physics experiments. "The superconducting radiofrequency accelerator technology that the FEL is built on allows us to tune laser light through a wide range of frequencies, including the infrared, terahertz, and soon, ultraviolet. Traditional lasers don't have that capability; they can only provide light at one frequency," Dylla explains.

These research results were presented during a talk, titled "Action Spectrum for Selective Photothermal Excitation of Fatty Tissue" on April 9 during the Dermatoplastics session of the American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery (ASLMS) annual meeting. This work was supported in part by the Department of Defense; by the Office of Naval Research; and by the Commonwealth of Virginia. This research is generating a large amount of local, national and international media coverage. Visit the "Free-Electron Laser Targets Fat" News Release and scroll down for links to a portion of that media coverage.

Leadership changes announced for JLab's SRF Institute (top ^)

Warren Funk is now on the International Linear Collider/Global Design Group. An article in the April 2006 symmetry publication, “ILC Industrialization: Getting Down to Business” includes Funk.

Earlier this year, Accelerator Division Associate Director Swapan Chattopadhyay announced leadership changes at the top of JLab's Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Institute.

Warren Funk, who had been at the helm of the SRF Institute since April 1, 2002, had been asked to join the International Linear Collider/Global Design Group by the ILC/GDE Director Barry Barish. Funk, with concurrence from senior Lab management, accepted this half-time position dedicated to the ILC. He stepped down as SRF Institute director so he could focus on ILC/GDE efforts. During the remaining 50 percent of his time, Funk is working closely with Accelerator Division management to develop strategies for the industrialization of SRF technology and mentoring division professionals in project management.

Robert A. Rimmer
Director of JLab’s Institute of SRF Science and Technology

At that time Chattopadhyay named Deputy Director Robert A. Rimmer as the Acting Director of the SRF Institute. That move became permanent effective April 16, 2006, when the Associate Director of the Accelerator Division formally appointed Robert Rimmer as Director of the Institute of SRF Science and Technology at Jefferson Lab
Rimmer graduated from Lancaster University with a Ph.D. specializing in microwave science and technology.  His doctoral thesis dealt with high power cavity windows in accelerators.  During his graduate work, Rimmer had experience with industry as well, working part-time for EEV Ltd. in the United Kingdom.  He joined Lawrence Berkeley National Lab in 1988 for the construction of the Advanced Light Source, and contributed to the development of high current RF (radiofrequency) cavities for accelerators including the PEP-II collider at SLAC (the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) and the NLC damping rings. He joined Jefferson Lab in 2002 as the Chief RF Scientist and Deputy Director for JLab's SRF Science and Technology Institute. Rimmer has established himself as a frontline contributor in the CEBAF RF Performance Integration team, SRF cavity HOM (high order mode) designs and high current SRF cavities and electron injectors envisioned for various ERLs (energy recovery linacs).

PrebleReese

Joe Preble (left) and Charlie Reece are now SRF Institute Deputy Directors. Preble has group leader responsibilities for Cryomodule Development and Production, and Reece has lead on Processes, Materials & Testing.

In a May 3 Accelerator Division-wide memo, Chattopadhyay also announced that the "SRF Institute will be further strengthened by the appointment of Joe Preble and Charlie Reece as two principal Deputy Directors, who reporting to and working with Bob, will take particular group leader responsibilities for 'Cryomodule Development and Production' and 'Processes, Materials & Testing' respectively."

"At this time I want to express... my gratitude to all SRF Institute staff members and the laboratory at large for their patience while we instituted the permanent leadership team in the SRF Institute, which is central to the laboratory's core mission," Chattopadhyay said in his memo. "Please congratulate Bob Rimmer, Joe Preble and Charlie Reece on rising to these challenging critical positions and give them your full support as we move forward."

 

 

JLab's Information Resources staff moves the library into the 21st century (top ^)

Kim Kindrew, JLab's Publications/ Records Manager, spends about 50 percent of her time on publications and 50 percent on records management. Here she prepares boxes of records in temporary holding in building 90, for long-term storage at the Federal Records Center.

Jefferson Lab's Information Resources staff is actively involved with its clientele and the growth and evolution of its customer services. Successful implementation of web-based desktop services has left little reason for most of JLab's staff and user community to physically come to the library these days. So, during April the IR staff decided to visit its clientele.

Information Resources staff members visited offices and work areas across much of Jefferson Lab during Records & Information Month, seeking to learn more about staff needs and sharing their messages regarding the publication of research done at JLab or by JLab researchers, and records management practices. They discovered that most work centers can benefit from assistance in one or both of these areas.

 

Meet Kim Kindrew, JLab's Publications/Records Manager

Kindrew has been at JLab for six years; she's been in the information management field since 1995.

Many of you know Kim Kindrew as JLab's publications manager, but she is the Lab's records manager as well. As the Lab's records manager, Kindrew made great strides in promoting the Lab's Records Management system. She initiated the Lab's processes for sending important materials to the Federal Records Center for storage, and shredding unneeded documents.

A career high point for Kindrew took place in March 2002 when then Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham commended Jefferson Lab "for successfully completing the transition from paper to electronic technical information reporting three years ahead of the DOE goal, using collaboration and best practices in a fully integrated E-government environment." He commended the achievement as a critical step in ensuring that information resulting from DOE's R&D activities is readily accessible to all appropriate users and supports the advancement of scientific knowledge.

As publications manager, Kindrew enjoys demonstrating to JLab scientists use of the electronic publishing system. "I always like seeing a new research paper published. The research done here is incredible, and I like to see it being shared with the world-wide scientific community. And it helps to promote the world-class research done at JLab," she says.

If asked, the IR staff will provide scientists and technical staff with tutoring programs on electronic publishing for their research papers. IR staff will assist administrators or anyone at the Lab who manages large amounts of documentation, with sorting both old and new documents to determine what can be discarded versus what must be kept, and overseeing the storage or destruction of those documents. The staff can also provide any work center with guidance in identifying "vital" records and advice in setting up the necessary provisions for appropriately managing this essential information.

Elois Morgan, Information Resources Manager; Kim Kindrew, Records and Publications Manager and Sandra D'Souza, Assistant Librarian, provide this support for the 600 employees at JLab. During their April walkabout, IR staff members surveyed those they talked with about the individuals' library/IR website use, solicited feedback on the electronic publication system and asked about their records management knowledge.

While IR staff members were unable to visit and chat with everyone, they are still interested in knowing about what you think and what you need, according to Elois Morgan. A suggestion box has been placed on the counter in the library and ideas and suggestions may be submitted via the drop box, the IR web page or direct e-mail. "If you have not visited the IR web page lately please do so," Morgan notes. "You may be pleasantly surprised."

The IR staff regularly reminds everyone at JLab that a "record" is defined as any document - paper, digital, even a voice mail - created or received in the course of business. Kim Kindrew, who is JLab's records manager as well as publications manager, says the best way to get a handle on your documents is to assess what you have and categorize your materials. Then with the help of IR, determine what can be destroyed, what should be kept for short periods and what must be sent to the Federal Records Center for long-term storage. IR can oversee documentation headed for the Federal Records Center and periodically it provides on-site shredding services.

The benefits of going through this process include: reduced accumulation, improved office or work area safety, better use of space, and the ability to organize the remaining materials which will save time in tracking or retrieving needed documents. This also provides you with the opportunity to identify and appropriately handle "vital" information and identify documents requiring long-term storage.

 

Check out FreeStock before you order JLab job supplies (top ^)

Before you order supplies for a JLab job, or you've run short of supplies midway through a project, visit the JLab Stockroom's FreeStock area. FreeStock carries wiring, cabling, switches (resistors, connectors and other electronic items), fasteners (nuts, bolts and washers), and some general office supplies. These items are usually leftover materials or supplies that have already been purchased.

Lawrence Ferbee, Jr., Stockroom clerk, stands with some of the FreeStock items and materials available for JLab work.

These materials and supplies may be used for JLab work being conducted at JLab, at no cost to the work group wishing to use them. With more than 800 items currently in FreeStock, the materials you need to finish your job just might be there - waiting to be picked up and used - at no cost to your group's budget, says Lawrence Ferbee, Jr., Stockroom clerk.

Anyone may submit usable or reusable, excess or leftover materials to FreeStock. Say you've just finished a job, moved your office, or cleaned out a storage cabinet and have usable quantities of materials or supplies you have no further use for - not trash, but stuff others can use - give them to FreeStock, Ferbee says. "It's a great way to use up leftover materials and supplies that the Lab has already paid for," he adds. "After all, one person's junk can be another's treasure."

Ferbee oversees JLab's FreeStock, which began as one cabinet in 1997 at the request of Bill Brisiel, Stockroom manager. Over the years the area has grown and now fills a full aisle in the Stockroom. Individuals with purchase accounts may peruse the electronic list of FreeStock items, visit http://esac.jlab.org/stock.html and sign on to the webstock page. At the top of the page is a FreeStock link. The list can also be accessed via db3 on the Lab's computer system.

JLab employees and users with or without purchase accounts may stop by the Stockroom in building 90, any time during normal business hours to examine FreeStock materials and supplies. There are rules with FreeStock items; for instance, individuals needing them must sign them out and take them from the Stockroom area. These items can't be delivered through the Lab's on-site distribution and delivery system. There are some items, such as unused toner cartridges that Ferbee won't allow in FreeStock, as they don't age well, and if the printer or copier model that used a type of cartridge is no longer on campus, the toner cartridges will never be used. "Then it's best to just put the cartridge into recycling, Ferbee noted.

Anyone with questions about posting something to, or getting something from FreeStock, may contact Ferbee, ext. 6297, or email ferbee@jlab.org; Bill Brisiel, ext. 7233, brisiel@jlab.org; or John Ferreira, ext. 7225, ferreira@jlab.org.

 

Register, volunteer now for JLab's 21st annual Run-A-Round (top ^)

Employees, users, subcontractors and immediate family members:Â Mark your calendar for JLab's Annual Run-A-Round set for Wednesday, May 17. The event will feature a 1.5 mile fun run/walk followed by a picnic. Online preregistration is now available for those wishing to run/walk during the Run-A-Round. Preregister online by 5 p.m. May 16. Registration the day of the race will be available in the CEBAF Center atrium from 8:30 a.m.-noon. Number/bib pickup for registered runners will be in CEBAF Center until 2 p.m. on race day, May 17.

The event kicks off with the unveiling of JLab's 2006 T-shirt at 2:30 p.m. in the CEBAF Center circle. The fun run/walk begins at 3 p.m. The picnic, T-shirt distribution and the awards presentation will follow on Rattley Road. Trophies will go to the overall first, second and third place male and female finishers. Gold, silver and bronze medals will be presented to the top finisher in each men's and women's age division.

"Volunteers are needed to stage this event. "Be part of the volunteer crew that makes this the most popular event of the season," requests Mary Jo Bailey, Jefferson Lab Activities Group (JAG) chair. "All volunteers get a free T-shirt, and all jobs are low stress." Volunteer sign up is also available online.

The finish line for this year's course will be near the intersection of the CEBAF Center parking lot and Rattley Road. The course will start as usual from the circle in front of CEBAF Center, go down Lawrence Road (paralleling Jefferson Ave.) and loop around the VARC before doubling back toward CEBAF Center. Get your shoes tied, your sunblock on and be prepared to start at 3 p.m. sharp! Visit the JAG web page for more information.

 

Science Education seeks JLab staff, users to talk with summer program teachers (top ^)

This summer JLab will be hosting middle school teachers participating in the Science Education group's Teacher Academy in Physical Science (TAPS) program. During July, teachers will be learning about geophysics, building projects, and designing ways to implement in their classrooms what they've learned at JLab.

"We'd like to use the unique environment and staff we have here by offering guest lectures on current science and research being conducted at the Lab," says Stacy DeVeau, Science Education. JLab staff or users interested in presenting a talk to these teachers may contact Stacy DeVeau (stacy@jlab.org or ext. 7560). "This is a great opportunity for teachers to learn what is happening in the scientific community, beyond the science classroom," DeVeau notes. "It's when teachers are enthused about science that they can best impart that enthusiasm to their students... the next generation of scientists!"Â She hopes to hear from possible speakers by June 16.

 

Department of Energy Gas Price Watch website and hotline available to consumers(top^)

Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman recently reminded consumers about the Department of Energy's (DOE) gasoline price reporting system. Consumers can report activity at local gasoline filling stations that they believe may constitute "gouging" or "price fixing" by visiting http://gaswatch.energy.gov/ .

"There are many legitimate factors influencing the price consumers are paying at the pump, including growing demand, the high price of crude oil, the lingering effects of last summer's hurricanes on our refining sector and the regular transition of fuel blends as we head into the summer," said Secretary Bodman. "And while the majority of local merchants are fair and honest people, there may be some individuals looking to take advantage of consumers in this high price environment. By reporting suspicious activity, consumers can help us send a message that illegal activity won't be tolerated and bad actors will be held accountable."

Price gouging, price fixing, and other forms of collusion by suppliers or retailers may violate federal or state law, and may be subject to prosecution by federal or state enforcement authorities. Last year, nearly 35,000 people reported gasoline prices to the Department of Energy's web site and hotline. All complaints registered with DOE are collated and transmitted to the Federal Trade Commission, the U.S. Department of Justice, and individual State Attorneys General for investigation and prosecution where appropriate.

In addition to reporting suspicious behavior, consumers can take a number of steps to save money by increasing the mileage they get from a gallon of gas. Some of these steps include:

1. Slow down. Each 5 miles per hour an individual drives over 60 is like paying an additional $0.15 per gallon for gasoline. Aggressive driving including speeding, rapid acceleration and braking is not only unsafe but also wastes fuel.

2. Keep your car properly maintained and running smoothly. Tune-ups, clean air filters, properly maintained tires, and using the appropriate grade of oil for your vehicle can help you save money at the pump.

3. Use your engine wisely. Avoid excessive idling and use cruise control and overdrive gears for better fuel mileage.

4. Be smart about driving. Group errands together to reduce unnecessary trips, join a carpool, or use mass transit if available. In some places, telecommuting may be a possibility.

5. Keep your car light. Too often cars become long-term storage facilities for sporting equipment or household items.

Consumers who do not have access to the Internet can report suspicious activity by calling 1-800-244-3301.

 

State College Area High School from Pennsylvania wins DOE's National Science Bowl®; Virginia's TJHSST finishes in top 16 (top ^)

WASHINGTON, DC - State College Area High School from State College, Pennsylvania, on May 1, 2006, won the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Science Bowl®.  Teams representing 65 schools from across the United States competed in this "Science Jeopardy" competition, which concluded this afternoon.

Members of the winning team include Jason Ma, Ylaine Gerardin, Barry Liu, Galen Lynch, Francois Greer and coach, Julie Gittings. This team won a research trip to France and $1,000 for their school's science department.  The answer that clinched the championship was in response to an earth science question about earthquake concentration zones.

"I would like to congratulate State College Area High School for their victory in the Department of Energy National Science Bowl®," Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman said.  "All of the young people in this competition demonstrated a mastery of a variety of scientific and technical subjects.  These students embody the excitement in science and mathematics that we are trying to promote through our American Competitiveness Initiative.  By working together to energize our science funding, the U.S. will remain the world's leader in science, engineering, and discovery."

"In our global knowledge economy, mathematics and science skills are becoming increasingly essential in fields from business to media to policymaking.  This competition showcases the talents of outstanding young problem- solvers who have the potential to improve the lives of people around the world.  I truly enjoyed the chance to see the students in action," Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings said.

As part of the American Competitiveness Initiative, President Bush has proposed to double the funding for basic research in the physical sciences to nearly $19.5 billion in 2016.  This increased investment will begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2007, as the President has requested $10.66 billion (a 9.3 percent increase over FY 2006) for basic science research at DOE's Office of Science, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology.  With this funding, the Office of Science will be able to support about 2,600 more researchers than in 2006. 

DOE's Office of Science stands to gain more than $500 million in FY 2007 as part of the American Competitiveness Initiative.  If the ACI is fully funded by Congress, the Office of Science's budget will increase from $3.6 billion in 2006, to $4.1 billion in FY 2007, and eventually to $7.19 billion in 2016.  The Office of Science is the principal supporter of DOE's world-class national laboratory system that will lead the way in innovations including high-end computing, nanotechnology, biotechnology, energy sources, and other material science research.

The American Competitiveness Initiative will also support educational activities, such as the DOE National Science Bowl®, in an effort to excite more middle and high school students to take mathematics and science classes.  

More than 300 students competed in this weekend's 16th annual DOE National Science Bowl® tournament.  Earlier this spring, more than 12,000 students from 1,800 schools across the country participated in 65 regional Science Bowls.  The winners of the regional Science Bowls earned the right to compete in the national finals in Washington, DC, and received all-expense paid trips to the DOE National Science Bowl®.  DOE recognizes all the students who competed as true mathematics and science stars, representing the nation's next generation of scientists and engineers.

DOE created the National Science Bowl® in 1991 to encourage high school students to excel in mathematics and science and to pursue careers in these fields.  The Department supports mathematics and science education to help provide a technically trained and diverse workforce for the nation.  More than 100,000 students have participated in the National Science Bowl® throughout its 16 year history.

Placing second in the DOE National Science Bowl® was North Hollywood High School from North Hollywood, California.  Team members are Joseph Chang, Alex Yen, Denise Ye, Timothy Hsieh, John Chen and coaches, Len Soloff and Rishita Shah.  The team won a trip to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, a DOE national laboratory, in Newport News, Virginia.   

The third place team was Santa Monica High School from Santa Monica, CA, including Benjamin Lucas, Dimitry Petrenko, Bennett Rankin, ZeNan Chang and coach Ingo Gaida, whose prizes included TI-83 silver edition calculator and Computer Based Laboratories II.

The fourth place team was Albany High School from Albany, CA including Zi Wang, Ian Allen, Bing Xia, Jackie Quinn, Andrey Poletayen, and coach, Peggy Carlock.  The team's prizes included TI-83 silver edition calculator.

Star Lane Center from Casper, Wyoming, won the Civility Award for outstanding sportsmanship.  Team members are Emma Barrasso, Cabot Crump, Dane Patey, J. Stephen Pye, Eric Yeager and coach, George Vlastos.  They won a trip to the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center in Colorado.

The Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl winner - the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology (Alexandria) finished among the top 16 teams.

On Saturday, April 29, two teams won in separate competitions of the Hydrogen Fuel Cell Model Car Challenge. The Maine School of Science and Mathematics of Limestone, Maine, won first place in the "king of the hill" competition and Woodrow Wilson High School of Portland, Oregon, placed first in the "speed race."  They were among 16 teams, chosen by lottery, to compete. 

 

Samuel Aronson named interim Brookhaven National Lab director (top ^)

UPTON, NY - The Board of Directors of Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA), which manages Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Department of Energy, announced on April 18 that Samuel Aronson, the Lab's Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for High Energy and Nuclear Physics, would become the Laboratory's Interim Director when Director Praveen Chaudhari stepped down on April 30, 2006. Chaudhari announced on February 17, 2006, that he would step down at the end of April 2006.

Aronson, a physicist, has been managing Brookhaven National Laboratory's largest directorate since his appointment to the ALD position last April, overseeing the operation of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Laboratory's Physics Department. Prior to that, he had been chair of the Physics Department. Visit the Brookhaven Laboratory News announcement for additional information.