JEFFERSON LAB SEARCH


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  • Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science national laboratory. Jefferson Lab's unique and exciting mission is to expand our knowledge of the universe by studying the basic building blocks of matter within the nucleus: subatomic particles known as quarks and gluons.

  • Hall D is the newest of Jefferson Lab’s four experimental halls. It is dedicated to the operation of a large-acceptance detector for experiments with a high-energy, polarized photon beam. The experiments are carried out by an international group of scientists called the GlueX collaboration.

  • Jefferson Lab has four experimental halls. Hall C is 150 feet in diameter and 60 feet tall.

    Hall C houses two large spectrometers, the High Momentum Spectrometer and the new Super High Momentum Spectrometer.  The hall also provides space for temporary installation of other detectors such as the Neutral Particle Spectrometer and the Large Acceptance Detector.

    The research equipment in Hall C is used to study form factors and 3-D structure of simple quark systems, and short range structure in nuclei.

  • Jefferson Lab has four experimental halls. The smallest of these is Hall B, measuring roughly 98 ft in diameter and 65 ft from floor to ceiling. From 1995 to 2012, the heart of the Hall B physics program involved the use of a particle detector system known as “CLAS,” an acronym that stands for the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. This magnetic spectrometer was based on a superconducting toroid and measured the trajectories of charged particles created in interactions of the beam with a fixed target to determine their momenta.

  • Jefferson Lab has four experimental halls. Hall A is the largest of these four experimental staging areas. It is 174 feet across and 80 feet tall from the floor to the highest spot on its domed ceiling. The foundation for the hall is 35 feet below ground.

    Hall A is outfitted with two primary detector systems – both high-resolution spectrometers, each weighing about 3 million pounds or 1,500 short tons. The hall is used primarily for experiments that study the structure of the nucleus and the protons and neutrons it contains.

  • The proton's primary building blocks, up and down quarks, are produced more often than strange quarks in scattering experiments.

    The Science

  • Calculations of a subatomic particle called the sigma provide insight into the communication between subatomic particles deep inside the heart of matter.

    The Science

    After decades of catching brief glimpses of a fleeting subatomic particle called the sigma in experimental data, nuclear physicists have used supercomputers to calculate it, with the result displaying similar properties to that of a real-world sigma particle inferred from experimental data.

    The Impact

  • First mixed matter/anti-matter probe aims to solve decade-old proton puzzle.

    The Science

  • The newly upgraded Jefferson Lab CEBAF Accelerator opens door to strong force studies.

    The Science

    Scientists have been rigorously commissioning the experimental equipment to prepare for a new era of nuclear physics experiments at the newly upgraded Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab in Newport News, Va. These activities have already led to the first scientific result, which demonstrates the feasibility of detecting a potential new form of matter.

    The Impact

  • Using tools that enable nuclear physics research into the heart of matter, scientists created a material for applications from aerospace to solar panels.

    The Science