Tech Tuesday

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Learn how nuclear physics has been used to diagnose and treat many types of cancer, including breast cancer. ...
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Most of us walk around with a smart phone, but I bet it’s news to many that the tools first built to understand the workings of the nucleus of the atom, the same tools used here at Jefferson Lab, became the tools to ultimately create smart phones (and more). Having my smartphone is great; it helps me get through my busy day. It lets me stay in touch with my family, and gives me the ability to me check my email on the go. I can text the dog sitter, take pictures and share them on social media, and so on and so on. The inner workings of any smart phone, and in fact all digital electronics, is a reality because of the development of the semiconductor based integrated circuit (IC) made through the use of particle accelerators. Ok, so now I have to explain some things (geek alert). Semi What? “Semi” used here means that...
Interesting and sometimes unexpected connections arise between nuclear physics and other fields. This edition of Tech Tuesday shows how these connections can yield benefits for nuclear physics and fields as diverse as medical imaging and archeology. ...
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One of my childhood heroes was Leonardo da Vinci. He represented so many things to me: an artist, a scientist and an inventor. I later learned that the step from scientist to inventor is an easy one. While I was never able to call myself an artist, I did manage to rightfully take on the mantles of scientist and inventor.  At Jefferson Lab, we are designing and performing experiments in new ways to revel the secrets of the matter that makes up our universe. The search for these treasures of knowledge takes many twists and turns. Along this journey it is not surprising that inventions and discoveries result from our efforts. You most likely have heard that necessity is the mother of invention. I often see that the mother of invention is just good old-fashioned paying attention. Pay Attention! What do I mean by that? Here at Jeffers...
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I’m lucky.  I’m part of a team of scientists, engineers and technicians that have been asked by our country to seek better understanding of the universe. Besides getting new insights into the nature of our universe, the things we learn while conducting research help to make our lives better. I mentioned in an earlier post that basic understanding of the universe gained by probing the mysteries of the atomic nucleus has led to life-saving devices from small smoke detectors to large medical centers that treat cancer. So read on to learn the nuclear physics origin of the invention of the smoke detector. Like many at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, I started out as a geeky kid who grew up to be a geeky adult. Luckily, I’ve found a home in Jefferson Lab to answer the nation’s call for probing the...
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As a child, you probably remember being fascinated by everyday things: that shiny rock you kicked or that weird looking beetle that you saw darting around a porch light. Kids typically have many questions for their parents: Why do roly-poly bugs wrap themselves up like a ball? Why do we get sunburned? Where does rain come from? Of course, children think parents should know the answers. It’s often this child-like curiosity that drives scientists to ask basic questions about the world around us. Such as why do stars sometimes explode or why do people get cancer but elephants rarely do?  Since we’re not going to get these answers from our parents, we have to turn to our instruments (or make new ones), and then go explore. As a scientist with Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility for more than two decades, I&rs...
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