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100 Percent Pass Rate for Latest JAG Dog Therapy Certification Class

100 Percent Pass Rate for Latest JAG Dog Therapy Certification Class

The JAG Dog Training Club members took the Canine Good Citizen/Therapy Dog International test on June 16, 2016 at Coastal Dog Training in Newport News. In spite of it being very warm in the testing building as there was no air conditioning, 100 percent of the Jefferson Lab dogs passed the test, reports Joyce Miller, club captain.

The CGC/TDI evaluator was really impressed with the class. He thought the JLab dogs were very nice, well-behaved and would all make great therapy dogs!


Front row, kneeling, left to right:  Sofia Hernandez-Santillan holding Chucho (poodle/terrier mix), Scarlet Santillan, Mary Boggs holding Irene (pug/pomeranian mix), Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, and Emilio Hernandez-Santillan.

Back row, standing, l.to r.: Benji (goldendoodle), Bridget Dowd, Molly Dowd, Lochlan Gisanrin, Nathan Harrison holding Lily (walker hound), Brian Kross, Mocha (greyhound), Ingrid Kross, Regen (German shepherd), and Joyce Miller, PG (greyhound).

 

Volunteers Sought to Help During Aug. 15-19 Science Camp for Deaf/Hard of Hearing Youth

Volunteers Sought to Help During Aug. 15-19 Science Camp for Deaf/Hard of Hearing Youth

Most slots for the Aug. 15-19 session of Jefferson Lab’s Science Camp for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students are filled, and Science Education staff members are seeking volunteers interested in providing some basic assistance to the students.

We’re seeking high-school students to grandparents who are willing to assist students in completing activities on Aug. 18 and 19, a Thursday and Friday. Volunteers will help the students in completing the math, graphs, and data tables associated with planned activities, according to Brita Hampton, Science Education. Volunteers will not be leading activities.

Volunteers will also be needed during lunch time, 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., Monday – Friday, Aug. 15-19, to help students going through Quark Cafe for lunch.

Any members of the JLab community, family members (aged 16 and up) and friends who are interested in helping out for an hour, an entire day or more are asked to contact Hampton at Hampton@jlab.org.   She may also be contacted for additional information.

The program will run from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. daily and will be conducted in the Support Service Center, SSC, Bldg. 28, classroom, Room 72A. Lunch will be eaten in the Quark Cafe dining areas in CEBAF Center.

Volunteers do not need any experience working or interacting with deaf or hard of hearing youth. Volunteers do not need to know American Sign Language (ASL).

A volunteer meeting will be held before the camp starts where all of the activities and basic duties will be discussed.

Returning to Work After a Respiratory Infection

Occ Med Guidance: Returning to Work After a Respiratory Infection

All,

In recent weeks I've noticed that many staff members were recovering from upper respiratory infections (usually a cold).  I've received questions about the criteria for safe return to work during convalescence from such illnesses.

This can be a difficult decision. It's not necessary or feasible to require yourself to be completely asymptomatic before returning to work.  For instance, sometimes cough can persist for many weeks.  Such "post bronchitic coughs" aren't contagious the way early-stage coughs are.

Here are my suggestions:

  • Don't return to work until you feel well enough to do so.
  • Don't return if, off medication, you have muscle aches because those strongly imply that you are still contagious.
  • Most importantly, don't return if, off medication, you have a fever.  Define fever as an elevation above the temperature range that's typical for you when you aren't ill.  For instance, often your temperature is measured during routine visits to your physician.  If you don't have a feel for your non-ill baseline temperature, then assume it is 98.6 F and consider fever to be 99 or higher. There are medical operational definitions of fever. For instance to some physicians, fever is 1.5 degrees above baseline. I don't recommend bothering with these definitions. Most of them are intended for use in triggering medical interventions. The most protective definition for return to work is the one I mentioned above.
  • There are many exceptions. For instance prolonged cough can be from TB (tuberculosis), not post-bronchitic convalescence. Fever can be from cancer. My suggestions assume the context of an uncomplicated cold-like illness.
  • If you aren't sure whether you can safely return to work, you can consult your personal physician or call Occ. Med. at ext. 7539 or 5585.

Thanks. Please let me know if you have any questions.

-Smitty
--
W. Smith Chandler, MD, MPH, MS
Site Occupational Medicine Director
Jefferson Lab

Information on 3D Mammography

Occ Med Director Provides Information on 3D Mammography

All,

The purpose of this note is to call attention to the existence of 3D mammography. This technology has become more available since its introduction in 2010 and evidence is accumulating that it might provide important scientific advantages, along with possible logistical and expense-related disadvantages.

For instance, 3D appears to detect up to 41 percent more early cancers. This can result in detection of cancer more than a year earlier than standard technology would. In addition, 3D decreases the need to call women back for additional imaging of suspicious areas.

Regarding logistical and financial disadvantages, the Sentara mobile mammography van that visits JLab annually doesn't have a 3D unit.  However, Sentara's nearby brick and mortar center does. Sentara is considering adding mobile 3D capability but hasn't decided yet. You can read about Sentara's mammography program at: http://sentaracaresmammogram.com/hamptonroads2/?_vsrefdom=p.4389.  In addition, Riverside and Bon Secours also provide mammography services.

I recommend that women learn about 3D mammography. WebMD has provided a useful overview at:  http://www.webmd.com/breast-cancer/news/20140624/3d-mammograms-may-improve-breast-cancer-screening?page=3.

In addition, the most recent American Cancer Society guidelines are located at:  http://www.cancer.org/healthy/informationforhealthcareprofessionals/acsguidelines/breastcancerscreeningguidelines/index.  Links lead to an explanation of why the Society doesn't yet provide guidelines about 3D.

Thank you for considering this update. If you are uncertain about whether to utilize 3D technology, please consult your personal physician.

-Smitty
--
W. Smith Chandler, MD, MPH, MS
Site Occupational Medicine Director
Jefferson Lab

Catch the Free Yoga Classes on Wednesdays in CEBAF Center

Catch the Free Yoga Classes on Wednesdays in CEBAF Center

As a JAG activity, Joe Beaufait, Physics Division, is offering free, all-level yoga classes on Wednesdays in CEBAF Center. The classes run from 5:30-6:30 p.m. and take place in one of three areas of CC: the auditorium, or conference room F113 or F224/225.

Joe is a 200-hour certified yoga instructor. He describes this all-level class as friendly to the beginner, but offers plenty of challenges for those who want to push themselves. Yoga is a great way to lower blood pressure, lose weight, gain flexibility and reduce stress, he adds.

If you are interested, just bring a yoga mat, and wear easy-to-move-in clothing to the class.

If you’d like notification, let Jodi Patient, CEBAF Center receptionist, know and she’ll post the classes to your zimbra calendar.