TITLE:

ES&H Manual

 

DOCUMENT ID:

6145 Appendix T5

Use of Forklift Attachments and Lifting Devices

 

 

1.0          Purpose

 

Jefferson Lab considers forklift attachments and lifting devices to be material handling equipment.  As such, they are subject to the requirements of this appendix and ES&H Manual Chapter 6140 Material Handling Equipment Program and its associated appendices. 

 

2.0          Scope

 

A forklift attachment is a modification or addition to a forklift that affects its capacity, stability, or safe operation.  Lifting devices are used for lifting heavy loads, and when maintained for use with a forklift, do not affect the capacity or safe operation of the truck.

 

The requirements of this document are performed in coordination with ES&H Manual Chapter 6140 Material Handling Equipment Program and ES&H Manual Chapter 6145 Material Handling Equipment – Forklifts and Attachments.

 

3.0          Responsibilities

NOTE:     Management authority may be delegated at the discretion of the responsible manager.

 

3.1          Qualified Forklift Operators

·       Have current training for forklift attachments as described in the ES&H Manual Chapter 6145 Appendix T1 Training Requirements – Forklift Operators and Attachments. 

·       Do not allow anyone to use an attachment that you have in use.

·       Return the attachment and key to the assigned location after each use.

 

3.2            Subcontracting Officer’s Technical Representative (SOTR)

·       Contact the Material Handling Safety Representative well in advance if use of a forklift attachment is required. Sub-contractors are seldom aware of the OSHA requirements for the use of attachments.

 

3.3            Material Handling Safety Representative (MHSR)

·       Obtains forklift manufacturers approval to use an attachment with a specific forklift.

 

3.4            Material Handling Engineering Representative (MHER)

·       Provides oversight of forklift attachment adequacy, safe use, annual inspection and operator training.

 

4.0          Description

 

4.1          Forklift Attachments

Jefferson Lab maintains several types of forklift attachments for use by forklift operator after completing SAF 502B Forklift Attachment Training:

 

·       Jib Booms are available for use with certain forklifts as authorized by the manufacturer.  Additional training is required for use.  Contact the MHER to discuss boom capacities during lift planning. 

o   Contrx Industries Model JLT424 - 2 Ton Telescoping Jib Boom

o   Contrx Industries Model JLT630 - 3 Ton Telescoping Jib Boom

o   T&S Equipment Co Model LM-OBT/6 - 3 Ton Orbital Telescoping Jib Boom

 

·       Drum Lifter available for use on one forklift.  Additional training is also required for its use.  Contact the MHER for authorization requirements.

o   Vestil Mfg. Corp. Eagle-Beak Drum Lifter

 

·       Long (18 feet) Fork Extensions available for use on one forklift.  A lift Plan is required prior to use.

 

4.2          Lifting Devices

Lifting devices, maintained for use with a forklift, do not affect the capacity or safe operation of the truck.  These include:

 

·       Single Hook Fork Beam – Used to provide positive handling of loads otherwise impractical for forklifts.

o   Three fork beams, each rated for a 2,000lb load

o   Caldwell Co. Model 10-2-20 Single Hook Fork Beam

 

·       Shield Block Lifters Used to assist in the occasional and repetitive movement of shield blocks.

o   Jefferson Lab 24,000# S2 Shield Block Lifter

 

·       Pallet Crusher Used to break down wood pallets after placing in 40 yard open top dumpster.

o   Jefferson Lab 9,100# Pallet Crusher - only one forklift in the Jefferson Lab fleet has the capacity rating necessary for this attachment.

 

Lift platforms - used for lifting personnel - are NOT approved for use with Jefferson Lab forklifts.

Contact the MHSR for clarification.

 

5.0          Requirements

 

5.1            Pre-Use Inspection

·       Prior to each use the forklift operator inspects the attachment in accordance with the requirements of ES&H Manual Chapter 6145 Appendix T3 Inspection and Maintenance – Forklifts and Attachments.

 

5.2            Use

 

5.2.1       Jib Booms – Telescoping

This attachment can introduce substantial changes to the stability of a forklift.  The distance a load is suspended in front of the forklifts mast (static load) and the effects (bumps and dips) have on the load (dynamic load) result in significant reduction in the capacity that a forklift can safely lift.

 

·       The load rating of a specific forklift and telescoping boom combination is determined by the forklift manufacturer.

·       A load chart has been created for each telescoping boom indicating the load capacity at the various boom positions for each forklift that is approved for use.  A load chart is attached to each boom.

 

Load charts provided by the boom manufacturer cannot be used to determine the authorized load carrying capability of the boom on a particular forklift.

 

·       Determine the weight of the object to be lifted and the amount of boom extension necessary for a lift.

o   Refer to the telescoping boom load charts to determine which boom/forklift combination has the required capacity at the desired boom hook position.

·       Select rigging gear necessary to attach the load to the boom

o   Rigging must be approved gear that complies with the requirements of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) B30.9 Slings and ASME B30.26 Rigging Hardware: Safety Standard for Cableways, Cranes, Derricks, Hoists, Hooks, Jacks, and Slings.

 

Rigging gear that complies with the above standards must not be used in a horizontal pull configuration.

 

·       Adjust the forks so that the inside width between the forks will fit into the fork pockets.  At least one fork must be locked to the bedplate of the mast.

·       Drive the truck forward to slip forks into the fork sleeves until the boom slides to the furthest position, away from the tips of the tines, against the mast.  Attach safety chain to mast to secure the boom attachment in position against the mast.

·       Accomplish the lift, using spotters and signalmen as needed.

o   Many hook positions are available under the boom.  The outer most position is generally the load supporting position when in use.  The remaining hook positions may be rigged to steady the load as needed.

o   Suspended loads must not be transported from one location to another on site.  Pre-position a shipping crate, pallet or transport vehicle in the immediate vicinity of the item to be lifted using this attachment.  

 

5.2.2       Drum Lifter

The eagle-beak drum lifter provides a convenient way to lift, transport and load 30- or 55-gallon single drums.  The drums may be open and closed head plastic, steel and fiber drums with a top lip strong enough to support the weight of the drum and has a maximum capacity rating of 1000 pounds.

 

·       Adjust the forks so that the inside width between the forks will fit into the fork pockets. At least one fork must be locked to the bedplate of the mast.

·       Drive the truck forward to slip forks into the fork sleeves until the tips of the tines contact the closed end of the fork sleeves.  Attach safety chain to mast to secure drum lifter attachment to the forks.

·       Tilt the fork truck mast forward and drive the tuck with the forks near the floor level to center the lifter in front of the drum until the lifter contacts the drum at the bottom drum grip.

·       With the mast still in the tilted forward position, raise the forks up.

·       When the upper jaw on the drum lifter engages the top of the drum lip, straighten the mast and raise the forks to transport the drum.

 

When transporting hazardous waste or traveling on rough surfaces attach the ratcheting strap to the bottom drum grip and tighten it around the drum.

 

·       To release the drum, remove ratcheting strap.  Lower the forks so that the drum sets flat on the floor and continue to lower forks until the upper jaw disengages itself.

 

5.2.3       Long (18 feet) Fork Extensions

This device has been engineered and fabricated at Jefferson Lab to permit movement of detector packages.  This device requires approval from the forklift manufacturer for use and from the Jefferson Lab MHER prior to each use.

 

·       The Hyster lift truck model H360XL (better known as Crusher) has the lifting capacity to lift this device.  No other forklift at Jefferson Lab has been approved for using these fork extensions.

·       An approved JLab Lift Plan (see ES&H Manual Chapter 6141 T4) is required for each use of the long fork extensions.  The lift plan must be signed by the MHER.

·       Two dedicated spotters are required when the fork extensions are attached to the forklift and the forklift is in motion.  The spotters should generally be positioned in front of and behind the forklift.  The spotters must be wearing high visibility vests, be in sight of the forklift operator and have direct communications with the forklift operator by a means other than shouting.  Two-way radio communication, whistles and air-horns are acceptable means of direct communications provided they are loud enough for the forklift operator to hear above the equipment operating sound level.

·       Loads may not be transported from one location to another on site.   Pre-position a shipping crate, pallet or transport vehicle in the immediate vicinity of the item to be lifted using long fork extensions.

 

5.2.4       Forklift Load Suspending Device

 

5.2.4.1  Single Hook Fork Beam

Single hook fork beams are seldom used at Jefferson Lab; however, they provide positive handling of loads otherwise impractical for forklifts.  Jefferson Lab maintains three fork beams, each rated for a 2,000 lb. load.  These devices do not require approval from the forklift manufacturer for use because they do not change the load carrying capacity or stability of the vehicle if used strictly for lifting and lowering.

 

Forklift operators are authorized to use fork beams as needed in accordance with the following instructions.  Contact the MHSR for introductory training and access to a beam.

·       Adjust the forks so that the outside inside width between the forks is 20”.  At least one fork must be locked to the bedplate of the mast.  The tines should be near the center of the mast.

·       Lift the 20# fork boom into position on the tines.  The boom may be positioned near the mast or as far away from the mast as the forklift data plate will allow not to exteed a rated load center dimension.

·       Tighten both screw retainers to contact the bottom of the tines.

·       Select rigging gear necessary to attach the load to the boom

o   The rigging must be approved gear that complies with the requirements of ASME B30.9 Slings and ASME B30.26 Rigging Hardware: Safety Standard for Cableways, Cranes, Derricks, Hoists, Hooks, Jacks, and Slings.

 

Rigging gear that complies with the above standards must not be used in a horizontal pull configuration.

 

·       Accomplish the lift, using spotters and signalmen as needed.  Restrict movement of the load to a minimum.  The suspended load is not to be transported from one location on site to another. Pre-position a shipping crate, pallet, or transport vehicle in the immediate vicinity of the item to be lifted using single hook fork beams.

 

5.2.4.2  Jefferson Lab 24,000# S2 Shield Block Lifter

This device has been engineered and fabricated at Jefferson Lab to permit movement of individual 24,000# S2 Shield Blocks using the pre-engineered lift points of the shield blocks.  This device does not require approval from the forklift manufacturer for use because it does not change the load carrying capacity or stability of the vehicle.

 

·       The Hyster lift truck model H360XL (better known as Crusher) has the lifting capacity to lift and transport 24,000# shield blocks.  No other forklift at Jefferson Lab has the capacity to use this lifting device.

·       Adjust the forks so that the inside width between the forks will fit into the fork pockets. Both forks must be locked to the bedplate of the mast.

·       Drive the truck forward to slip forks into the fork sleeves until the restraining tab firmly fixed to the block lifter passes the mast bedplate, lower the forks as needed to permit this positioning.  Raise the forks to pick up the block lifter load then inspect the position of the restraining tab for proper engagement behind the mast bedplate.

·       Center the block lifter over a S2 Shield Block and lower the block lifter sufficiently to permit engagement of the attached load hooks onto the pre-engineered lift points of the shield block.

·       Raise the block lifter with suspended shield block load and transport to the desired location.

 

5.2.4.3  Jefferson Lab 9100# Pallet Crusher

This device has been engineered and fabricated at Jefferson Lab to permit the compaction of wood crates and pallets in an open top 40 cu yd dumpster.  This device does not require approval from the forklift manufacturer for use because it does not change the load carrying capacity or stability of the vehicle.

 

·       The Hyster lift truck model H360XL (better known as Crusher) has the lifting capacity to lift this device to the required height for compaction.  No other forklift at Jefferson Lab has the capacity to use this lifting device.

·       Adjust the forks so that the inside width between the forks will fit into the fork pockets. Both forks must be locked to the bedplate of the mast.

·       Drive the truck forward to slip forks into the fork sleeves until the tips of the tines contact the closed end of the fork sleeves.  Attach safety chain to mast to secure the pallet crushing device to the forks.

·       Lower the pallet crushing device on top of wood crates and pallets placed in the dumpster to break the wooden members of the crates and compact the discarded material.

 

5.2.4.4  Free Rigging – Placing Rigging Equipment onto Tines

Although free rigging is a common practice, it could affect the capacity and safe operation of a powered industrial truck.  Free rigging can sometimes keep a simple task simple. 

 

Observe the following restrictions to the use of free rigging:

·       Free rigging must be accomplished by a qualified Overhead Crane Operator.  Crane operators receive training in the selection, inspection and use of slings and rigging hardware.

·       Rigging must be approved gear that complies with the requirements of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) B30.9 Slings and ASME B30.26 Rigging Hardware: Safety Standard for Cableways, Cranes, Derricks, Hoists, Hooks, Jacks, and Slings. The load must be rigged to equally distribute the load weight between the two tines of the forklift.

·       The rigging must be positioned at the load center dimension indicated on the forklift’s load plate.

·       Free rigged suspended loads must not be transported from one location to another on site.  Pre-position a shipping crate, pallet or transport vehicle in the immediate vicinity of the item to be lifted using free rigging.

·       Contact the MHER if all these restrictions cannot be met with your planned lift and you believe your planned method is the safest way to accomplish the lift.  A Lift Plan will be required (see ES&H Manual Chapter 6141 T4). The lift plan must be signed by the MHER.

 

6.0          References

 

·       29 CFR 1910.178 Powered Industrial Trucks

·       ANSI/ITSDF B56.1 – 2012 Safety Standard for Low Lift and High Lift Trucks

·       ES&H Manual Chapter 6145 Appendix T1 Use of Forklifts

·       ES&H Manual Chapter 6145 Forklift Safety

·       ES&H Manual Chapter 6141 T4 Hoisting & Rigging Operations (including Planning a Lift)

 

7.0          Revision Summary

 

Revision 2.0  10/01/13  Periodic Review - Added new devices and additional restrictions for the use of existing devices per DKausch.

Revision 1.0  04/12/10  Update to reflect current laboratory conditions.

 

ISSUING AUTHORITY

TECHNICAL POINT-OF-CONTACT

APPROVAL DATE

REVIEW REQUIRED  DATE

REV.

 

 

ESH&Q Division

Dave Kausch

04/12/10

10/01/16

2.0

 

This document is controlled as an on line file.  It may be printed but the print copy is not a controlled document.  It is the user’s responsibility to ensure that the document is the same revision as the current on line file.  This copy was printed on 10/1/2013.