Fall Lectures Feature Life of Einstein; Exploring Our World With Particle Accelerators

NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Sept. 22, 2010 – Jefferson Lab's first 2010 Fall Science Series lecture,  "Einstein For Everyone," is set for Tuesday, Oct. 5, and will feature the life, challenges and achievements of the young Albert Einstein.

Einstein was a rebel who seemed doomed to fail, according to guest lecturer Robert Piccioni, author of "Everyone's Guide to Atoms, Einstein and the Universe." Piccioni, who has a Ph.D. in High Energy Physics from Stanford University, was a faculty member at Harvard University and did research at the Stanford Linear Accelerator in Calif., will discuss: how Einstein overcame rejection to become the most famous scientist in history. He will explain Einstein's theories in plain English and without math, and show how Einstein's achievements impact our lives through DVDs, GPS, iPods, computers and green energy.

Then, on Tuesday, Nov. 23, James E. Brau, University of Oregon, will present "The Mysterious Universe – Exploring Our World with Particle Accelerators."

The universe is dark and mysterious, more so than even Einstein imagined, Brau says. While modern science has established an understanding of ordinary matter, scientists now know that previously unidentified elements (dark matter and dark energy) dominate the structure of the universe, its behavior and its destiny. Brau will discuss how researchers are working address these unknowns with experiments at particle accelerators. Results of this research may revolutionize our view of nature as dramatically as the advances of Einstein and other quantum pioneers, according to Brau. He will introduce the questions being advanced, the research facilities being used to study these mysteries and discuss our current understanding of the underlying science. The presentation will be at an introductory level, appropriate for anyone interested in physics and astronomy.

The lectures are free and open to students and adults with an interest in science. All lectures begin at 7 p.m., in the CEBAF Center auditorium located at 12000 Jefferson Ave, Newport News, and last for about an hour. Seating in the auditorium and overflow area is available on a first-come, first-served basis and is limited to about 300 people. People arriving once capacity has been reached will be turned away.

All those under age 16 must be accompanied by a parent or responsible adult. For security purposes, enter at Jefferson Lab's main entrance (Onnes Drive.). Everyone over 16 is asked to carry a valid photo ID. Security guards may perform ID, parcel and vehicle checks. For directions and additional information about Jefferson Lab public lectures, visit http://education.jlab.org/scienceseries/index.php, or contact Christine Wheeler, e-mail wheelerc@jlab.org or call 757-269-7560.

A live video stream is available for those not able to attend in person. Lectures will be added to the video archive for on-demand viewing upon approval from the presenter.

Jefferson Lab is one of 17 U.S. Department of Energy national research laboratories and facilities. It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC for the DOE’s Office of Science.