Jefferson Lab announces two Fall Science Series events — featuring magic and football

Using humor, stagecraft and lighting, along with laboratory experiments disguised as magical illusion, the audience will view science from a perspective most have never seen before with Bob Friedhoffer, author, scientist and magician. He will conduct "Einstein and Beyond - The Magic Show" on Tuesday, Oct. 25 at the Jefferson Lab CEBAF Center auditorium.

The magic show will concentrate on Newtonian mechanics, relativity, and the quantum world. Many of the principles that he will discuss and explain are difficult to see in everyday existence. Friedhoffer, New York University, brings science information and education to the public using unique and innovative forms of exposition that astound, mystify, entertain and inform. In other words, he makes science interesting and fun. For more on his work, the books he has written and the toys he has developed, visit his website at www.sciencetrix.com/.

Friedhoffer will also give this presentation at Old Dominion University, Norfolk, on Wednesday, Oct 26, at 7 p.m. in room 102 of the Mills Godwin Building on the ODU campus. For details see about that presentation, visit http://argon.physics.odu.edu/seminars/index.phtml?action=view&id=123.

Then on Tuesday, Nov. 15, the University of Nebraska's Timothy Gay, will discuss "Football Physics - The Science of the Game." The presentation will feature a series of one-minute physics lectures on topics ranging from gyroscopic motion to ionizing collisions between football players.

After years of teaching Cornhuskers attending UN games the physics of football during breaks in the action at Memorial Stadium, he has now taken his show on the road. He explains in scientific detail why some punts have more hang time than others, why spirals stabilize a football's flight and precisely how much force is generated when two 300-pound linemen collide at full speed.

The professor touches on but doesn't dwell on the brute force of the game (i.e. Newton's Second Law). He says. "I'm not interested in that. I want to get something new."

The presentations begin at 7 p.m. in Jefferson Lab's CEBAF Center auditorium, located at 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News. The programs are free and open to anyone interested in learning more about science; they last about one hour and include a question and answer period at the end. For security purposes during Science Series events, enter at Jefferson Lab's main entrance (Onnes Dr.). Everyone over 16 is asked to carry a photo ID and security guards may perform ID, bookbag and purse and vehicle checks. For more information, visit http://education.jlab.org/scienceseries/currentseries.html.

Call 269-5102 for more information.

Jefferson Lab, or the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, in Newport News, Va., is a basic physics research facility funded through the U.S. Department of Energy' Office of Science.

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Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility’s (Jefferson Lab’s) basic mission is to provide forefront scientific facilities, opportunities and leadership essential for discovering the fundamental structure of nuclear matter; to partner in industry to apply its advanced technology; and to serve the nation and its communities through education and public outreach. Jefferson Lab, located at 12000 Jeffeson Avenue, Newport News, Virginia, is a Department of Energy Office of Science research facility managed by the Southeastern Universities Research Association.