DOE Conducts JLab Facilities Operations Review

FacOpsRev2.jpg

Jehanne Gillo, chair of the JLab Facilities Operations Review and director of the Facility & Project Management Division, within the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Physics, presents the review committee's comments, findings and recommendations at the close out session.

An exhaustive three-day review of facility operations at Jefferson Lab ended with both cautionary and supportive words from Jehanne Gillo, chair of the review and director of the Office of Nuclear Physics Facility & Project Management Division within the Department of Energy's Office of Science.

The review covered a range of near-term and future projects and operations and included projected staffing, workloads and budgets out to 2016.

“Clearly, there are some things we need to work through,” Gillo said in concluding remarks at the close out of what she termed a “friendly review.” Cooperation will be important, because “funding is going to be tight,” and the 12 GeV Upgrade has made Jefferson Lab “one of the fastest-growing items in our (ONP) budget … and we need to understand what it is that you need,” according to Gillo.

“We want to ensure that 12 GeV is supported when it comes on line,” she added. …"You are a high priority in the Office and we look forward to working together with you … to achieve an exciting and robust 12 GeV program."... more


JLab Scientist's Efforts Earn DOE Pollution Prevention Award

Jian-Ping ChenA bit of ingenuity, a passion for science and a drive to cut costs led Jefferson Lab scientist Jian-Ping Chen, known to his friends and colleagues as "J.P.", to a Department of Energy Pollution Prevention Best in Class award......more

 

CEBAF 'Flips' for Better Beam Control

Two-Wien Flipper Since delivering the very first electrons for experiments, CEBAF accelerator scientists and operators have found ever-more ingenuous methods for tweaking the electron beam. Now, they've installed a new set of components designed to easily flip the polarization of electrons.....more

 

Toward a Better Bomb Detector

Bomb Detector JLab's superconducting radiofrequency expertise attracts federal interest & funding to explore better ways to identify nuclear weapons......more


Below the Fold:

DOE Conducts JLab Facilities Operations Review

Lab Director Hugh Montgomery talks with Helmut Marsiske, a member of the Office of Nuclear Physics' Facilities & Project Management Division, in DOE's Office of Science after the Facilities Operations Review conducted July 19-21.

An exhaustive three-day review of facility operations at Jefferson Lab ended with both cautionary and supportive words from Jehanne Gillo, chair of the review and director of the Office of Nuclear Physics Facility & Project Management Division within the Department of Energy's Office of Science.

The review covered a range of near-term and future projects and operations and included projected staffing, workloads and budgets out to 2016.

“Clearly, there are some things we need to work through,” Gillo said in remarks at the close out of what she termed a “friendly review.” Cooperation will be important, because “funding is going to be tight,” and the 12 GeV Upgrade has made Jefferson Lab “one of the fastest-growing items in our (ONP) budget … and we need to understand what it is that you need,” according to Gillo.

“We want to ensure that 12 GeV is supported when it comes on line,” she added. …"You are a high priority in the Office and we look forward to working together with you … to achieve an exciting and robust 12 GeV program."

The eight-member review panel included representatives from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, CERN, and Cornell University.

Panel members received an overview of the lab’s strategic plan, staffing and budget plans for fiscal years 2004 through 2016, and needs for operation in the 12 GeV era. They also reviewed the lab's accelerator operations, accelerator research and development, engineering and computing, experimental instrumentation and operations needs in the 12 GeV Upgrade era.

The panel praised the lab’s general management, noting that the lab “effectively establishes scientific goals and has identified reasonable levels of resources supporting the accelerator and experimental programs in FY2010.” The panel cited many other strengths, but also noted some areas in need of improvement and set deadlines for the lab to provide DOE with more information about future budgets, priorities and staffing.

“It’s clear we have work to do,” Montgomery said after the review panel made its report. “The first thing to do is to digest the report and then to work with it.” He added that the lab “will endeavor to benefit” from the review.

 

JLab Scientist's Efforts Earn DOE Pollution Prevention Award

Pollution Prevention Best in Class award

JLab scientist Jian-Ping Chen, receives a Department of Energy Pollution Prevention Best in Class award from then Jefferson Lab Site Office Manager Jim Turi at a presentation event in the CEBAF Center auditorium.

A bit of ingenuity, a passion for science and a drive to cut costs led Jefferson Lab scientist Jian-Ping Chen, known to his friends and colleagues as "J.P.", to a Department of Energy Pollution Prevention Best in Class award.

The challenge he and his colleagues faced was their need for a high-precision sodium-iodide (NaI) detector, the price tag of which – at a couple of million dollars – was not only out of the budget but impossible to contemplate. "Very few companies make these," he noted, "and even a small one, which we could have gotten by with, would have been a bargain at $1 million."

In addition, this type of detector is difficult to handle – super sensitive to any kind of moisture or rough handling. The problem they faced seemed insurmountable, but their commitment to science prevailed.

After much searching and colleague’s help, Chen found a 20-year-old detector at Brookhaven National Lab, which had originally been used at Los Alamos. "We were very, very lucky that we called just at the time they finished using it," he said. The detector would provide his group with 400 of the rectangular NaI crystal blocks, which could be re-formed into the detector his group needed.

Then they had to get it here. With the help of researchers at Temple University in Philadelphia, JLab users and designers were able to design a transportation system that protected each piece. They safely got the crystal blocks here, but their work was far from over.

sodium-iodide crystals

This photo shows the refurbished sodium-iodide crystals ready for installation in Hall A for Experiment E05-110, dubbed the Coulomb Sum Rule Experiment.

Because NaI crystals are extremely hygroscopic – or water absorbing – a humidity-controlled dry room had to be built in the Experimental Equipment Lab and, because of the age and previous use of the crystals, each block had to be refurbished individually. Several people worked in two shifts every day for the next several weeks, often dressed in uncomfortable hermetically sealed, full-body suits and through a glove box, to not only hand polish each one of the 400 blocks, but also to put them together and assemble the readout units and electrical fittings as well. The work took more than two months and involved dozens of people.

"We got very good support from everyone," Chen pointed out, "and we were fortunate to have a lot of students who were interested in working on it. The cost of recycling the used crystals was about $120,000 versus more than a million dollars to buy new ones."

Data collection for Experiment E05-110, dubbed the Coulomb Sum Rule Experiment, took a couple of months – just about the same length of time it took to get the detector ready. And once the work was done, the detector found another new life, this time at Duke University. "Duke had actually asked for it first," Chen said with a laugh, "but they wanted it for later work. We said 'We're ready for it now,' and got it first. They got a good deal though; we did all the hard work of refurbishing it."

For refurbishing the NaI crystal blocks and the savings that resulted from the work, Chen received the DOE pollution prevention best in class award in December 2009.

sodium-iodide crystals

This photo shows the refurbished sodium-iodide crystals assembled into a detector package with bases and photomultiplier tubes.

Chen came to Jefferson Lab as a staff scientist in 1994, after finishing postdoctoral work at MIT and the University of Virginia, from which he received his Ph.D. in 1990. In December 2008, he was named a Fellow of the American Physical Society for his contributions to understanding the spin structure of the neutron, through the use of a polarized Helium-3 target in experiments run using CEBAF, or the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility.

Born in Shanghai, Chen had been accepted into the prestigious University of Science and Technology of China as a student in theoretical physics. He was fortunate to be among those selected for one of the first China/U.S. Physics Exam and Application programs (CUSPEA), through which several dozen U.S. universities sought out and invited to the United States high-achieving Chinese students.

He was among the 100 or so selected, and came first to the University of Virginia. "Charlottesville was very friendly, very warm," he recalls. "When I first arrived there from mainland China, there was a small group of Chinese students. Over the years, that population has grown."

He spent his first years at UVa working in theory, but a professor piqued his interest in experimental physics. "I thought the work that was going to be done at CEBAF looked very interesting," he recalled, "and I liked the idea of working with other people. I switched from theory to experiment in 1986."

He and his wife, June, live in Yorktown and have a son, Alan, who's a student in civil engineering at Virginia Tech.

Working with students is close to Chen's heart. "I love working with young people, and getting to see them grow," he said. "They're so interested and enthusiastic about their work. That's one of the most fulfilling parts of what I do here. After all these years, I still hear from many of them. It's good to know I had a part in their success."

By Judi Tull
Feature writer

 

CEBAF 'Flips' for Better Beam Control

injector group

After installing the Two-Wien Flipper device in the CEBAF injector, the group involved in the upgrade project gathered for a group photo.

Since delivering the very first electrons for experiments, CEBAF accelerator scientists and operators have found ever-more ingenuous methods for tweaking the electron beam. Now, they've installed a new set of components designed to easily flip the polarization of electrons.

In CEBAF, most experiments require a polarized electron beam. A polarized beam is one in which the spins of the electrons are mostly aligned in one direction. Experimenters often want to flip the sign of the polarization (spin direction) during an experiment to extract information that depends precisely on the electrons' spins.

CEBAF’s beam originates in the electron gun, where short bursts of polarized laser light strike a thin wafer of material. When struck by laser light, the wafer releases electrons that form the electron beam.

"The easiest place to manipulate the sign of the polarization is with the laser light. Once you make the electrons, those spins are either going to be aligned one way or another," says Joe Grames, an injector scientist in Jefferson Lab's Accelerator Division.

Two-Wien Flipper

Joe Grames, injector scientist, stands in the background. Pictured in the foreground is the Two-Wien Flipper, a device that can be used to control the spin direction of the electrons in CEBAF's electron beam. The upgrade to CEBAF's injector system gives researchers the ability to more efficiently flip the sign of the beam's polarization (spin direction) during an experiment so they can extract information that depends on the electrons' spins.

The electron gun’s laser system contains two devices that are capable of changing the polarization of the laser light. The first – a Pockels cell – rapidly changes the sign of the laser light, and so the sign of the polarization of the electron beam changes. A second device – a waveplate – flips the overall sign of the laser light, and thus the electron beam, when it is inserted into the laser's path. But either of these devices could introduce other, very small changes to the electron beam.

"You don't want any of the other beam parameters to change – you don't want the intensity to change or where it hits the target to change or the angle it hits the target to change," Grames adds.

Enter the Two-Wien Flipper, a device that can be used to control the spin direction of the electrons entirely independent of the laser light. The Two-Wien Flipper is an upgrade of the single Wien filter that was already in place.

The single Wien filter had been used to compensate for precession of the electrons' spins. As the electrons sail through the accelerator, their route is controlled by magnets. These magnets also have an unintended effect on the electrons – they cause the electrons' spins to precess, or predictably wobble, as they travel through the machine. The Wien filter was used to make up for this precession.

But a single Wien Filter wasn't capable of what the experimenters wanted to be able to do: completely rotate, or flip, the beam polarization from one direction to its opposite. The ability to flip the electron beam polarization directly, rather than the laser polarization, is crucial for running PREx and future experiments, such as Q-weak. These experiments aim to measure such tiny differences when the electron beam is flipped from one polarization to its opposite that even minute changes introduced by changing the laser light could potentially lead to false results.

"We couldn't do this with our one Wien filter, but we could do it with two and some solenoids," says Grames. He led the installation of the new components of the Two-Wien Flipper system.

"Think about a thousand people carrying arrows or spears, they can all come running in with the spears in one direction," Grames explains. "They might still be running forward through the Wien filter, but all their spears can now just move around independently on their body. We can now make three rotations and point the spin anywhere and deliver it to the user. And that's a really nice capability."

Joe Grames

Joe Grames stands next to a portion of the Two-Wien Flipper.

The installation of the new system was a highly coordinated and time-sensitive effort. The installation began as soon as the accelerator was taken offline for the winter down period in December 2009.

"We didn't have access to build the new beamline until the winter shutdown began, so we built up and fabricated as much equipment as we could," Grames explains. "Then on Dec. 22, we went in there, and we ripped everything out. And so, when we came back after the holiday, it was a matter of starting fresh and doing the whole build. It was a lot of work; there were many, many pieces to put together."

Grames and his team, which included members from several departments across the laboratory, pulled out roughly five meters of accelerator components to install the new system.

"The weirdest moment for me was to stand there and see the electron gun on one side, the choppers on the other and nothing in between but the floor. That's a really critical part for the machine, and we don't touch it much, because almost every centimeter is accounted for with something," Grames says.

Just six weeks later, the gap was fully reconstructed with the Two-Wien Flipper in place, and the accelerator operators were bringing the accelerator back online for experiments.

"To the credit of everybody involved and their diligence, we turned on, we had beam through and almost everything worked. There were things that didn't work, but they were small."

By Kandice Carter
Science writer

 

Toward a Better Bomb Detector
JLab's superconducting radiofrequency expertise attracts federal interest & funding to explore better ways to identify nuclear weapons

Plasma Deposition Lab

Test samples are prepared in JLab's ECR Plasma Deposition Lab. Here a witness sample is mounted along side a test sample on a sample stage. The ECR Plasma Deposition System is used to apply a niobium coating onto the test sample and the witness samples.

In their search for new accelerator components, researchers at Jefferson Lab may be making progress on developing a better way to identify weapons of mass destruction.

Currently, X-ray scans, radiation detectors and hand-screening are used to detect materials that could fuel a nuclear bomb, such as plutonium and uranium.

But none of these methods provides a fool-proof, quick procedure for identifying illicit materials. For instance, X-ray machines can gauge the density of objects, but not an object’s radioactivity, while radiation detectors can identify unshielded radioactive materials, but can be tripped up by naturally radioactive products, such as marble countertops and cat litter.

Some security experts think the best way to spot material that could be used to make a nuclear bomb is to identify the nuclei, and therefore the elements, present in that material. For that, an accelerator is in order.

"They'd really like to have a portable source of a particle beam to interrogate elements. These things need to be portable and compact," explains Charles Reece, deputy director of the Jefferson Lab Institute for Superconducting Radio Frequency Science and Technology.

Reece says the roadblock to building such an accelerator is that the device would require a dramatic increase in efficiency compared to current technology. In particular, there would need to be a vast improvement in accelerating gradient, which is a measure of a component's ability to impart its stored energy to the particles it is designed to accelerate in a short distance.

Accelerating gradients are quantified in Megavolts per meter (MV/m). Bomb sniffing would require an accelerating gradient of more than 100 MV/m. Unfortunately, the theoretical limit for the material currently used for SRF accelerator components, a metal called niobium, is less than 50 MV/m.

Reece and his colleagues have been exploring alternative materials for SRF accelerators to get beyond this limit.

"There exists a theoretical framework that says you can have a very finely controlled, multi-layer scheme of sandwiched superconductors and insulators. That structure will support higher fields than any of the materials alone would be able to support, and thus make higher-accelerating gradients," Reece says.

The theory calls for a series of thin layers of superconducting niobium compound interleaved with thin layers of an insulating material, over a base of niobium.

"If the layer is thin enough, then the field is unable to penetrate it and heat up the cavity," Reece explains. "This seems to be a credible theory, but so far, no one has been able to produce surfaces with this layered structure."

witness sample

This is a test sample that has been coated with niobium and then tested.

witness sample

This is a witness sample that has been coated with niobium.

Reece says the primary task at hand is to learn how to produce small samples of the sandwiched material. The group will start with thin-film alloys made primarily of niobium, which are attached to insulating layers containing aluminum or magnesium. Once made, the samples will be tested.

Last year, Reece and his colleagues received funding from the Department of Energy's Office of Science under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to explore this theoretical thin-film design concept as well as pure niobium films. The award provides $1.4 million directly to the laboratory for the research over three years.

"There are two goals for the program. First, we want to learn what it takes to make thin-film niobium that behaves better than bulk niobium," Reece says. "We also want to explore other materials that would allow the components to operate at higher temperatures or higher accelerating gradients than niobium."

Then, in April, Reece and his colleagues learned that they would also get funding from a second grant, received by R.A. Lukaszew, VMEC Associate Professor in the College of William & Mary’s departments of physics and applied science. The grant, from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, initially provides $350,000 of funding for each of three years. Pending project progress, it could be extended for an additional two years. Jefferson Lab will receive about $100,000 each year for its part of the project.

"Our role in that is to help validate any film that might be created. We can actually measure the performance and say this is on target or not," he says.

Reece is working with several other laboratory staff members on the project, including Larry Phillips, Anne-Marie Valente-Feliciano, Xin Zhao and Josh Spradlin. He and his colleagues have also enlisted the assistance of researchers at Norfolk State University and Old Dominion University. These colleagues have labs in the Applied Research Center.

"This entire group together has all of the film creation, analysis and characterization tools to pursue thin films in a way that is unique," Reece says.

Reece says the goals of the project mesh well with Jefferson Lab's aim to advance superconducting radiofrequency accelerator technology. The SRF Institute has continued to push the boundaries of scientists' understanding of SRF technology. Additionally, as the first large installation of SRF technology, the laboratory's CEBAF accelerator has provided a wealth of information on the operating limits of niobium in SRF accelerator technology.

This new research could lead to a new breed of thin-film accelerator component, which would require far less of the expensive metal niobium, could allow for more powerful and more compact accelerators, and may require less refrigeration capacity to operate.

For now, Reece and his colleagues are excited to use their expertise to potentially provide for the nation's defense.

"You can't get there with anything else. There is no other option. You either use thin films, or you can't get there," Reece says.

By Kandice Carter
Science writer

 

Beam Physics Symposium to Honor Y. Derbenev

Yaroslav Derbenev

Yaroslav Derbenev, a member of JLab's Center for Advanced Studies of Accelerators will have his 70th birthday recognized with a Beam Physics Symposium at JLab on Aug. 2 and 3.

On Aug. 2 and 3, Jefferson Lab will host an international event to celebrate a milestone for both a scientist and his half century in science. The laboratory is holding a Beam Physics Symposium to honor the 70th birthday and lifetime of achievements in accelerator and beam physics of Yaroslav "Slava" Derbenev, whose distinguished career stretches from Novosibirsk to Yerevan and from Ann Arbor, Mich., to JLab's Center for Advanced Studies of Accelerators.

Please mark your calendar to join us for beam physics discussions, says Andrew Hutton, chair of the event's international advisory committee and associate director of JLab's Accelerator Division. The symposium URL is http://conferences.jlab.org/bps2010/ and registration is requested of attendees. 

The event is scheduled take place from about 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day in CEBAF Center. A special reception on Monday, Aug. 2, from 5-6:30 p.m. will cap the day's lectures and discussions. Registered participants will hear from leaders and innovators in the world of beam physics. On the list of invited speakers are: Christoph Leemann, former JLab director; Swapan Chattopadhyay, director of the Cockcroft Institute; Sergei Nagaitsev, Fermilab; Vladimir Litvinenko, Brookhaven National Lab; Vasiliy Morozov, JLab; Thomas Roser, BNL; Alan Krisch, University of Michigan; Mai Bei, BNL; Vadim Dudnikov, Muons, Inc.; Don Edwards, DESY; Helen Edwards, Fermilab; Frank Zimmermann, CERN; Kaoru Yokoya, KEK; Vladimir Shiltsev, Fernilab; Gennady Stupakov, SLAC; Anatoliy Kondratenko, Zaryad; Paul Emma, SLAC; David Douglas, JLab; Alexey Burov, Fermilab, and Rol Johnson, Muons, Inc. JLab Director Hugh Montgomery and Andrew Hutton, associate director of the Accelerator Division, will also participate.

A special session recognizing Derbenev will take place from 4 to 5 p.m. on Aug. 2 in the CEBAF Center auditorium. The entire JLab community is invited to this portion of the symposium.

The symposium will focus on several beam physics topics including:

  • Beam Cooling
  • Beam Polarization
  • Colliding Beams
  • Beam Dynamics
  • Beam Transport
  • Free-Electron Laser
  • Synchrotron Radiation

Derbenev, who will be keynote speaker at the symposium, was awarded the U.S. Particle Accelerator School Prize for Achievement in Accelerator Physics and Technology in 2007. He was honored for his seminal contributions to the theory of beam polarization in accelerators and its control with "Siberian snakes," the theory of electron cooling and the inventions of "round-to-flat" beam optics transformations and novel six-dimensional muon cooling schemes. More about his work and the award are available at: https://www.jlab.org/news/ontarget/jlab-newsletter-e-ontarget-july-2007#derbenev .

For more information about the symposium, contact Audrey Barron, JLab, via email: anichols@jlab.org or by phone: 757-269-7327. Or contact Yuhong Zhang, email yzhang@jlab.org or call 757-269-7509.


Lenzer Receives Value Engineering Award

Lawrence D. Miles Founders Award

Bruce Lenzer, a member of JLab's Quality Assurance and Continuous Improvement team, accepts the Lawrence D. Miles Founders Award from David Wilson, the president of SAVE International, at the organization's annual conference in June.

Bruce Lenzer, a member of Jefferson Lab's Quality Assurance and Continuous Improvement team, received a prestigious award in June from SAVE International at the organization's annual conference in California.

The Lawrence D. Miles Founders Award is given in honor of the "Father of Value Engineering," Lawrence D. Miles. Miles founded SAVE International; formerly known as the Society of American Value Engineers. The Founders Award is the highest SAVE International award given for technological achievement without regard to membership status or grade. The scope of this award covers all endeavors related to the promotion and advancement of the value discipline. According to the society's webpage, those receiving this award "must be nationally recognized as having created a technological advancement or achievement, so that it is widely adopted for use by others in industry or government."

In the organization's 50 years, this marked the ninth time the Founders Award has been presented.

Lenzer earned the recognition based on an innovation he created called the Hybrid Function Analysis System Technique to model business processes. He described it as a function-oriented precedent logic model which also interfaces process flow with functions depicted in a graphical format. According to Lenzer, this technique allows quality and value engineering practitioners the ability to diagnose process flow issues using a function logic approach.

Separately, he has also developed a tool that gives practitioners the ability to cost model these processes to better understand the impacts of time, cost and organizational interfaces. Both tools are being used by other Value Engineering practitioners and companies.

"Several successful projects have been performed using this technique," Lenzer noted. "Boeing helped one of their commercial airline services customers model its shop and line maintenance processes which resulted in saving $30 million per year in resource efficiency and improved on-time performance."

While Lenzer said receiving the award was an honor, the best gratification for him was being able to give back to the professional organization and fellow practitioners – new tools and techniques to help their organizations and customers.

 

 


Training Helps Subcontracting Officer's Technical Representatives Understand Contract Oversight Responsibilities

Procurement staff members

The SOTR training is offered on the last Wednesday of every month. It is presented by Procurement staff members Kathleen Jones, Mitchell Laney and Sharon Williams.

Jefferson Lab's Subcontracting Officer's Technical Representatives handle a wide range of contract management responsibilities. They provide technical oversight on everything from ensuring that the subcontractor is complying with JLab policies and procedures, and providing clarification and technical direction to the subcontractor to monitoring and reporting on work progress and contract funds, inspecting and accepting goods and services, and monitoring and evaluating the contractor's technical performance.

To help prepare SOTRs for their many and varied responsibilities, the Procurement Department has instituted a training class and a certification process for all current and new SOTRs. The content of the class was developed through the working of a High-Performance Work Team composed of a cross section of JLab employees representing procurement; human resources; facilities management; environment, health, safety and quality; the Accelerator and Physics Divisions and the 12 GeV Upgrade Project. The HPWT was facilitated by Bruce Lenzer.

The objectives of the class are to ensure that SOTRs understand:
- The important ethical and legal issues governing the acquisition of supplies and services,
- The essential requirements for soliciting goods and services, and
- The essential elements of contract administration, ensuring safety, quality and timeliness.

The class, GEN020 SOTR Training, is offered on the last Wednesday of every month. It runs from 8:30 a.m. to 12-noon in ARC 428, and is presented by procurement staff members Kathleen Jones, Mitchell Laney and Sharon Williams. Class size is kept between 10 and 12 and time is scheduled to discuss the material and examples. Sign up for the class is on-line through the training and development webpage.

The training is specifically targeted to "certify" SOTRs that will be assigned work involving:
- Construction, installation or fabrication work on JLab property,
- Services performed at JLab with an unmitigated Risk Code of 2 or higher, or
- Procurements estimated at greater than $100,000 using JLab specifications.

All new SOTRs that will have responsibility for this type of work must be trained and certified before taking on SOTR responsibilities. Individuals currently performing as SOTRs, that haven't yet taken GEN020, have a year to take the class.

According to Procurement Director Mark Waite, the SOTR training class benefits everyone involved – JLab, the subcontractor and the federal government – because it helps the SOTRs ensure:
- Safer work processes and environmental awareness,
- Better planned and executed acquisitions,
- Informed decision making that enhances efficiency, saves money and mitigates risks,
- Better quality products and services,
- Enhanced relationships that serve the best interests of JLab, the government and JLab's business community, and
- Compliance with the laboratory's contract with the Department of Energy.

"The class provides important guidance for anyone that is (or will be) interacting with Procurement, and I particularly encourage all current SOTRs needing certification to take the class as soon as possible," Waite said. "We have three highly knowledgeable staff members who worked hard to put the class together. This is information that is valuable for the SOTR to know and understand."

Procurement maintains a list of JLab-certified SOTRs at: http://www.jlab.org/div_dept/admin/business/procurement/JLAB_Certified_SOTRs.pdf .


JLab's Science Enrichment Program for 5th, 6th & 8th Grade Teachers

Jefferson Lab is currently accepting applications for its science enrichment program for fifth-, sixth- and eighth-grade teachers of science.

The program, designed to increase teachers' knowledge of the physical sciences and strengthen their teaching skills, runs from September 2010 through May 2011 and is called Jefferson Lab's Science Activities for Teachers, or JSAT, program.

The after-school program builds teachers' skills in the physical sciences, according to Lisa Surles-Law, program administrator.

"At the elementary and middle-school level, teachers, with little or no formal background in science education, often find themselves tasked with teaching the science curriculum," she said. "This program is a primer for them and a refresher for those with a formal education in science. JSAT provides attendees with a wealth of materials and activities to take back to their classrooms, and a chance to network with other teachers.”

The 2010-11 program will include interactive activities to enhance physical science instruction at the upper-elementary and middle-school levels, and lectures by Jefferson Lab staff on the applications of science. Topics will include matter, atomic structure, energy transfer, force and motion, magnetism and electricity, waves and sound, simple machines, and watershed and optics. Program participants will receive supplies and materials so they may conduct all the planned activities in their own classrooms.

The program, funded by a grant from the Jefferson Science Associates Initiatives Fund, addresses components of National Science Education Standards and the Virginia Standards of Learning.

Fifth- and sixth-grade teachers usually meet on the first and third Wednesdays of each month. Eighth-grade teachers meet on the second and fourth Wednesdays every month. The sessions take place between 5-7 p.m. and are held in the science education classroom located in the VARC, Building 28.

More information and the application form are available at: http://education.jlab.org/jsat/ or by emailing Surles-Law at surles@jlab.org . The application deadline for the 2010-11 program is Friday, Sept. 17 Surles-Law may be reached by phone at 757-269-5002.

Session dates for the fifth- and sixth-grade teachers are: Sept. 22; Oct. 6, 20; Nov. 3, 17; Dec. 1, 8; Jan. 5, 19; Feb. 2, 16; Mar. 2, 23; Apr. 13 Teacher Night, and May 4 and 18.
Session dates for the eighth-grade teachers are: Sept. 29; Oct. 13, 27; Nov. 3, 17; Dec. 1, 8; Jan. 12, 26; Feb. 9, 23; Mar. 16, 30; Apr. 13 Teacher Night, and May 4 and 18.

Recent On Target stories about this program are available at:
JSA/JLab Program Empowers, Enriches Teachers of Science, and
Program Excites Teachers: What They Get, Take Back to Classroom, Share With Fellow Teachers.


Milestones for June Through July 2010

Hello

Kalyan Allada, Hall A Postdoctoral Fellow, Physics Division
Marcus Anthony, Installation Welding Technician, Engineering Division
Maryanne Arca, Project Planner/Scheduler, Chief Operating Officer Division
Roy Bennington, Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Mechanical Fabrication and Assembly Technician, Accelerator Division
Josephat (Luke) Biron, SRF Mechanical Fabrication and Assembly Technician, Accelerator Division
John Conger, Mechanical Computer-Aided Design Designer, Engineering Division
Zhe Chen, DC Power Systems Engineer, Engineering Division
Thomas DeSalvo, Mechanical Installation Technician, Engineering Division
Carolyn Dixon, Summer Student Clerical Assistant; Environment, Safety, Health & Quality (ESH&Q) Division
Roland Evans, Cryogenics Electrical Technician, Engineering Division
Larry Farrish, Radiofrequency System Technician, Engineering Division
Frank Golub, Mechanical Engineer, Engineering Division
Michael Haddox-Schatz, Database Programmer/Analyst, Information Technology Division
Christopher Hobeck, Accelerator Operator, Accelerator Division
David Gilchrist, SRF Fabrication and Assembly Technician, Accelerator Division
Stan Jackson, Graduate Student Intern, Environment, Safety, Health & Quality Division
Richard Jacobsen, Division Safety Officer, Chief Operating Officer Division
Jeff John, SRF Test and Measurement Engineer, Accelerator Division
Meghan King, Physics Student Intern, Physics Division
Leo Ketchum, Diagnostics Technician, Engineering Division
Nathaniel Laverdure, Cryogenics Mechanical Engineer, Engineering Division
Robert Legg, Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Operations Coordinator, FEL Division
Andrew Lumanog, Facilities Support Technician, Physics Division
Scott Madaras, FEL Technical Student Intern, FEL Division
John Mammosser, Senior Engineer, Accelerator Division
Jared Martin, SRF Mechanical Fabrication and Assembly Technician, Accelerator Division
Elizabeth Anne McEwen, SRF Institute Business Manager, Accelerator Division
John McKisson, Electronics Engineer, Physics Division
Leo Meire, Mechanical Engineer, Chief Operating Officer Division
Randy Michaud, Operability Deputy Group Leader, Accelerator Division
Alfred Minn, Electrical Fabrication Technician, Engineering Division
Byron "Ken" Mitchell, Field Construction Manager/Superintendent, Chief Operating Officer Division
Donald Moffitt, Cryogenics Student Intern, Engineering Division
Jacob Morgan, Electrical Engineer, Engineering Division
Christopher Norris, Diagnostics Technician, Engineering Division
Brendan Preble, SRF Mechanical Fabrication and Assembly Technician, Accelerator Division
Thomas Prosper, SRF Mechanical Fabrication and Assembly Technician, Accelerator Division
Thomas Renzo, Structural/Civil Project Engineer, Chief Operating Officer Division
Taylor Robinson, Summer Student Aide, Chief Financial Officer Division
Julia Romanchik, Mechanical Engineer, Engineering Division
Ryan Slominski, Database Developer/Administrator, Accelerator Division
Thomas Stephenson, Electrical Engineer, Chief Operating Officer Division
Mark Thompson, Rotating Machinery Technician, Engineering Division
Joseph Westby-Gibson, SRF 12 GeV Upgrade Production Testing Associate, Accelerator Division
Wenze Xi, Radiation Detector Scientist, Physics Division
Nathan Zukerman, Facilities Maintenance Shop Technician, Chief Operating Officer Division

Goodbye
Phillip Childress, Facilities Management and Logistics
Leon Clancy, Accelerator Division, retired
Walter Moore, Mechanical Engineering Student Intern, Engineering Division
William Vulcan, Physics Division, retired

These Milestone entries, listed alphabetically, are full-time, term, casual and student actions posted by Human Resources for June and July 2010.

Jefferson Lab is currently seeking several qualified individuals for a wide range of engineering positions as well some scientific, managerial, technical and student intern positions. Nearly 30 JLab employment opportunities are currently posted at: http://www.jlab-jobs.com/ .


In Memoriam - Former CEBAF Staff Member "Skip" McGuire Died June 23

Clair L. McGuire "Skip," 69, late of Warsaw Ind., passed away June 23. He is survived by his son, John (Kim) McGuire, his daughters, Noreen (Jim) Nielsen, Tina (Steve) Gabinski, step-children Jeanette (Keith) Grenke, and Matthew Kunke, eight grandchildren and one great-granddaughter. He was preceded by his wife Kathleen (nee Decman) (2009), his parents, John and Dorothy (nee Crissman) McGuire, and his brothers, William and Richard McGuire. He was a member of VFW Post #9810 and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. He retired from the U.S. Department of Energy, having worked at Argonne, Fermilab, and CEBAF (now Jefferson Lab). He was a long-time resident of Joliet, Ill., prior to his retirement. A service was held on June 26. Interment followed at St. Joseph Cemetery, Joliet. McGuire worked at JLab for many years.


Summer Students Poster Session Set For July 30

High school and college interns that participated in Jefferson Lab's summer science enrichment programs will share their summer experiences and projects during a poster session scheduled for Friday, July 30, from 11:45 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the CEBAF Center lobby. The entire JLab community is invited to stop in any time during the poster session.
The six participants of the High School Summer Honors Program, and the 30 participants of either the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship program or the Old Dominion University Research Experiences for Undergraduates program, will be presenting posters they developed based on their work or research projects.

Their respective summer projects directly involved them in the culture, activities and science of Jefferson Lab. Projects range from accelerator engineering, experimental research, free-electron laser projects and computer programming.

The On Target newsletter is published monthly by the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), a nuclear physics research laboratory in Newport News, Virginia, operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. Possible news items and ideas for future stories may be emailed to jlabinfo@jlab.org, or sent to the Jefferson Lab Public Affairs Office, Suite 15, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606